• The U.S. government is poised to withdraw longstanding warnings about cholesterol
    Peter Whoriskey

    Time to put eggs back on the menu? (Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)
    The nation’s top nutrition advisory panel has decided to drop its caution about eating cholesterol-laden food, a move that could undo almost 40 years of government warnings about its consumption.

    The group’s finding that cholesterol in the diet need no longer be considered a “nutrient of concern” stands in contrast to the committee’s findings five years ago, the last time it convened. During those proceedings, as in previous years, the panel deemed the issue of excess cholesterol in the American diet a public health concern.

    The finding follows an evolution of thinking among many nutritionists who now believe that, for healthy adults, eating foods high in cholesterol may not significantly affect the level of cholesterol in the blood or increase the risk of heart disease.

    Story continues below advertisement

    The greater danger in this regard, these experts believe, lies not in products such as eggs, shrimp or lobster, which are high in cholesterol, but in too many servings of foods heavy with saturated fats, such as fatty meats, whole milk, and butter.

    [Scientists have figured out what makes Indian food so delicious]

    The new view on cholesterol in food does not reverse warnings about high levels of “bad” cholesterol in the blood, which have been linked to heart disease. Moreover, some experts warned that people with particular health problems, such as diabetes, should continue to avoid cholesterol-rich diets.

    While Americans may be accustomed to conflicting dietary advice, the change on cholesterol comes from the influential Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, the group that provides the scientific basis for the “Dietary Guidelines.” That federal publication has broad effects on the American diet, helping to determine the content of school lunches, affecting how food manufacturers advertise their wares, and serving as the foundation for reams of diet advice.

    Story continues below advertisement

    The panel laid out the cholesterol decision in December, at its last meeting before it writes a report that will serve as the basis for the next version of the guidelines. A video of the meeting was later posted online and a person with direct knowledge of the proceedings said the cholesterol finding would make it to the group’s final report, which is due within weeks.

    After Marian Neuhouser, chair of the relevant subcommittee, announced the decision to the panel at the December meeting, one panelist appeared to bridle.

    “So we’re not making a [cholesterol] recommendation?” panel member Miriam Nelson, a Tufts University professor, said at the meeting as if trying to absorb the thought. “Okay ... Bummer.”

    Story continues below advertisement

    Members of the panel, called the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, said they would not comment until the publication of their report, which will be filed with the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Agriculture.

    [Here’s what the government’s dietary guidelines should really say]

    While those agencies could ignore the committee’s recommendations, major deviations are not common, experts said.

    Five years ago, “I don’t think the Dietary Guidelines diverged from the committee’s report,” said Naomi K. Fukagawa, a University of Vermont professor who served as the committee’s vice chair in 2010. Fukagawa said she supports the change on cholesterol.

    Story continues below advertisement

    Walter Willett, chair of the nutrition department at the Harvard School of Public Health, also called the turnaround on cholesterol a “reasonable move.”

    “There’s been a shift of thinking,” he said.

    But the change on dietary cholesterol also shows how the complexity of nutrition science and the lack of definitive research can contribute to confusion for Americans who, while seeking guidance on what to eat, often find themselves afloat in conflicting advice.

    Cholesterol has been a fixture in dietary warnings in the United States at least since 1961, when it appeared in guidelines developed by the American Heart Association. Later adopted by the federal government, such warnings helped shift eating habits -- per capita egg consumption dropped about 30 percent -- and harmed egg farmers.

    Story continues below advertisement

    Yet even today, after more than a century of scientific inquiry, scientists are divided.

    Some nutritionists said lifting the cholesterol warning is long overdue, noting that the United States is out-of-step with other countries, where diet guidelines do not single out cholesterol. Others support maintaining a warning.

    The forthcoming version of the Dietary Guidelines -- the document is revised every five years -- is expected to navigate myriad similar controversies. Among them: salt, red meat, sugar, saturated fats and the latest darling of food-makers, Omega-3s.

    As with cholesterol, the dietary panel’s advice on these issues will be used by the federal bureaucrats to draft the new guidelines, which offer Americans clear instructions -- and sometimes very specific, down-to-the-milligram prescriptions. But such precision can mask sometimes tumultuous debates about nutrition.

    Story continues below advertisement

    “Almost every single nutrient imaginable has peer reviewed publications associating it with almost any outcome,” John P.A. Ioannidis, a professor of medicine and statistics at Stanford and one of the harshest critics of nutritional science, has written. “In this literature of epidemic proportions, how many results are correct?”

    Now comes the shift on cholesterol.

    Even as contrary evidence has emerged over the years, the campaign against dietary cholesterol has continued. In 1994, food-makers were required to report cholesterol values on the nutrition label. In 2010, with the publication of the most recent “Dietary Guidelines,” the experts again focused on the problem of "excess dietary cholesterol."

    Story continues below advertisement

    Yet many have viewed the evidence against cholesterol as weak, at best. As late as 2013, a task force arranged by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association looked at the dietary cholesterol studies. The group found that there was “insufficient evidence” to make a recommendation. Many of the studies that had been done, the task force said, were too broad to single out cholesterol.

    “Looking back at the literature, we just couldn’t see the kind of science that would support dietary restrictions,” said Robert Eckel, the co-chair of the task force and a medical professor at the University of Colorado.

    The current U.S. guidelines call for restricting cholesterol intake to 300 milligrams daily. American adult men on average ingest about 340 milligrams of cholesterol a day, according to federal figures. That recommended figure of 300 milligrams, Eckel said, is " just one of those things that gets carried forward and carried forward even though the evidence is minimal.”

    Story continues below advertisement

    "We just don't know," he said.

    Other major studies have indicated that eating an egg a day does not raise a healthy person’s risk of heart disease, though diabetic patients may be at more risk.

    “The U.S. is the last country in the world to set a specific limit on dietary cholesterol,” said David Klurfeld, a nutrition scientist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. “Some of it is scientific inertia.”

    The persistence of the cholesterol fear may arise, in part, from the plausibility of its danger.

    As far back as the 19th century, scientists recognized that the plaque that clogged arteries consisted, in part, of cholesterol, according to historians.

    It would have seemed logical, then, that a diet that is high in cholesterol would wind up clogging arteries.

    In 1913, Niokolai Anitschkov and his colleagues at the Czar’s Military Medicine Institute in St. Petersburg, decided to try it out in rabbits. The group fed cholesterol to rabbits for about four to eight weeks and saw that the cholesterol diet harmed them. They figured they were on to something big.

    “It often happens in the history of science that researchers ... obtain results which require us to view scientific questions in a new light,” he and a colleague wrote in their 1913 paper.

    But it wasn’t until the 1940s, when heart disease was rising in the United States, that the dangers of a cholesterol diet for humans would come more sharply into focus.

    Experiments in biology, as well as other studies that followed the diets of large populations, seemed to link high cholesterol diets to heart disease.

    Public warnings soon followed. In 1961, the American Heart Association recommended that people reduce cholesterol consumption and eventually set a limit of 300 milligrams a day. (For comparison, the yolk of a single egg has about 200 milligrams.)

    Eventually, the idea that cholesterol is harmful so permeated the country's consciousness that marketers advertised their foods on the basis of "no cholesterol."

    What Anitschkov and the other early scientists may not have foreseen is how complicated the science of cholesterol and heart disease could turn out: that the body creates cholesterol in amounts much larger than their diet provides, that the body regulates how much is in the blood and that there is both “good” and “bad” cholesterol.

    Adding to the complexity, the way people process cholesterol differs. Scientists say some people -- about 25 percent -- appear to be more vulnerable to cholesterol-rich diets.

    “It’s turned out to be more complicated than anyone could have known,” said Lawrence Rudel, a professor at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

    As a graduate student at the University of Arkansas in the late 1960s, Rudel came across Anitschkov’s paper and decided to focus on understanding one of its curiosities. In passing, the paper noted that while the cholesterol diet harmed rabbits, it had no effect on white rats. In fact, if Anitschkov had focused on any other animal besides the rabbit, the effects wouldn't have been so clear -- rabbits are unusually vulnerable to the high-cholesterol diet.

    “The reason for the difference -- why does one animal fall apart on the cholesterol diet -- seemed like something that could be figured out,” Rudel said. “That was 40 or so years ago. We still don’t know what explains the difference.”

    In truth, scientists have made some progress. Rudel and his colleagues have been able to breed squirrel monkeys that are more vulnerable to the cholesterol diet. That and other evidence leads to their belief that for some people -- as for the squirrel monkeys -- genetics are to blame.

    Rudel said that Americans should still be warned about cholesterol.

    “Eggs are a nearly perfect food, but cholesterol is a potential bad guy,” he said. “Eating too much a day won’t harm everyone, but it will harm some people.”

    Scientists have estimated that, even without counting the toll from obesity, disease related to poor eating habits kills more than half a million people every year. That toll is often used as an argument for more research in nutrition.

    Currently, the National Institutes of Health spends about $1.5 billion annually on nutrition research, an amount that represents about 5 percent of its total budget.

    The turnaround on cholesterol, some critics say, is just more evidence that nutrition science needs more investment.

    Others, however, say the reversal might be seen as a sign of progress.

    “These reversals in the field do make us wonder and scratch our heads,” said David Allison, a public health professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “But in science, change is normal and expected.”

    When our view of the cosmos shifted from Ptolemy to Copernicus to Newton and Einstein, Allison said, “the reaction was not to say, ‘Oh my gosh, something is wrong with physics!’ We say, ‘Oh my gosh, isn’t this cool?’ ”

    Allison said the problem in nutrition stems from the arrogance that sometimes accompanies dietary advice. A little humility could go a long way.

    “Where nutrition has some trouble,” he said, “is all the confidence and vitriol and moralism that goes along with our recommendations.”

    Did the government’s dietary guidelines help make us fat?

    A local's guide to Mumbai, India

    5 simple Indian recipes to make at home

    Scientists have figured out what makes Indian food so delicious

    Ghee has been an Indian staple for millennia. Now the rest of the world is catching on.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2015/02/10/feds-poised-to-withdraw-longstanding-warnings-about-dietary-cholesterol/?utm_term=.1982832f86fa
    The U.S. government is poised to withdraw longstanding warnings about cholesterol Peter Whoriskey Time to put eggs back on the menu? (Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post) The nation’s top nutrition advisory panel has decided to drop its caution about eating cholesterol-laden food, a move that could undo almost 40 years of government warnings about its consumption. The group’s finding that cholesterol in the diet need no longer be considered a “nutrient of concern” stands in contrast to the committee’s findings five years ago, the last time it convened. During those proceedings, as in previous years, the panel deemed the issue of excess cholesterol in the American diet a public health concern. The finding follows an evolution of thinking among many nutritionists who now believe that, for healthy adults, eating foods high in cholesterol may not significantly affect the level of cholesterol in the blood or increase the risk of heart disease. Story continues below advertisement The greater danger in this regard, these experts believe, lies not in products such as eggs, shrimp or lobster, which are high in cholesterol, but in too many servings of foods heavy with saturated fats, such as fatty meats, whole milk, and butter. [Scientists have figured out what makes Indian food so delicious] The new view on cholesterol in food does not reverse warnings about high levels of “bad” cholesterol in the blood, which have been linked to heart disease. Moreover, some experts warned that people with particular health problems, such as diabetes, should continue to avoid cholesterol-rich diets. While Americans may be accustomed to conflicting dietary advice, the change on cholesterol comes from the influential Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, the group that provides the scientific basis for the “Dietary Guidelines.” That federal publication has broad effects on the American diet, helping to determine the content of school lunches, affecting how food manufacturers advertise their wares, and serving as the foundation for reams of diet advice. Story continues below advertisement The panel laid out the cholesterol decision in December, at its last meeting before it writes a report that will serve as the basis for the next version of the guidelines. A video of the meeting was later posted online and a person with direct knowledge of the proceedings said the cholesterol finding would make it to the group’s final report, which is due within weeks. After Marian Neuhouser, chair of the relevant subcommittee, announced the decision to the panel at the December meeting, one panelist appeared to bridle. “So we’re not making a [cholesterol] recommendation?” panel member Miriam Nelson, a Tufts University professor, said at the meeting as if trying to absorb the thought. “Okay ... Bummer.” Story continues below advertisement Members of the panel, called the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, said they would not comment until the publication of their report, which will be filed with the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Agriculture. [Here’s what the government’s dietary guidelines should really say] While those agencies could ignore the committee’s recommendations, major deviations are not common, experts said. Five years ago, “I don’t think the Dietary Guidelines diverged from the committee’s report,” said Naomi K. Fukagawa, a University of Vermont professor who served as the committee’s vice chair in 2010. Fukagawa said she supports the change on cholesterol. Story continues below advertisement Walter Willett, chair of the nutrition department at the Harvard School of Public Health, also called the turnaround on cholesterol a “reasonable move.” “There’s been a shift of thinking,” he said. But the change on dietary cholesterol also shows how the complexity of nutrition science and the lack of definitive research can contribute to confusion for Americans who, while seeking guidance on what to eat, often find themselves afloat in conflicting advice. Cholesterol has been a fixture in dietary warnings in the United States at least since 1961, when it appeared in guidelines developed by the American Heart Association. Later adopted by the federal government, such warnings helped shift eating habits -- per capita egg consumption dropped about 30 percent -- and harmed egg farmers. Story continues below advertisement Yet even today, after more than a century of scientific inquiry, scientists are divided. Some nutritionists said lifting the cholesterol warning is long overdue, noting that the United States is out-of-step with other countries, where diet guidelines do not single out cholesterol. Others support maintaining a warning. The forthcoming version of the Dietary Guidelines -- the document is revised every five years -- is expected to navigate myriad similar controversies. Among them: salt, red meat, sugar, saturated fats and the latest darling of food-makers, Omega-3s. As with cholesterol, the dietary panel’s advice on these issues will be used by the federal bureaucrats to draft the new guidelines, which offer Americans clear instructions -- and sometimes very specific, down-to-the-milligram prescriptions. But such precision can mask sometimes tumultuous debates about nutrition. Story continues below advertisement “Almost every single nutrient imaginable has peer reviewed publications associating it with almost any outcome,” John P.A. Ioannidis, a professor of medicine and statistics at Stanford and one of the harshest critics of nutritional science, has written. “In this literature of epidemic proportions, how many results are correct?” Now comes the shift on cholesterol. Even as contrary evidence has emerged over the years, the campaign against dietary cholesterol has continued. In 1994, food-makers were required to report cholesterol values on the nutrition label. In 2010, with the publication of the most recent “Dietary Guidelines,” the experts again focused on the problem of "excess dietary cholesterol." Story continues below advertisement Yet many have viewed the evidence against cholesterol as weak, at best. As late as 2013, a task force arranged by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association looked at the dietary cholesterol studies. The group found that there was “insufficient evidence” to make a recommendation. Many of the studies that had been done, the task force said, were too broad to single out cholesterol. “Looking back at the literature, we just couldn’t see the kind of science that would support dietary restrictions,” said Robert Eckel, the co-chair of the task force and a medical professor at the University of Colorado. The current U.S. guidelines call for restricting cholesterol intake to 300 milligrams daily. American adult men on average ingest about 340 milligrams of cholesterol a day, according to federal figures. That recommended figure of 300 milligrams, Eckel said, is " just one of those things that gets carried forward and carried forward even though the evidence is minimal.” Story continues below advertisement "We just don't know," he said. Other major studies have indicated that eating an egg a day does not raise a healthy person’s risk of heart disease, though diabetic patients may be at more risk. “The U.S. is the last country in the world to set a specific limit on dietary cholesterol,” said David Klurfeld, a nutrition scientist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. “Some of it is scientific inertia.” The persistence of the cholesterol fear may arise, in part, from the plausibility of its danger. As far back as the 19th century, scientists recognized that the plaque that clogged arteries consisted, in part, of cholesterol, according to historians. It would have seemed logical, then, that a diet that is high in cholesterol would wind up clogging arteries. In 1913, Niokolai Anitschkov and his colleagues at the Czar’s Military Medicine Institute in St. Petersburg, decided to try it out in rabbits. The group fed cholesterol to rabbits for about four to eight weeks and saw that the cholesterol diet harmed them. They figured they were on to something big. “It often happens in the history of science that researchers ... obtain results which require us to view scientific questions in a new light,” he and a colleague wrote in their 1913 paper. But it wasn’t until the 1940s, when heart disease was rising in the United States, that the dangers of a cholesterol diet for humans would come more sharply into focus. Experiments in biology, as well as other studies that followed the diets of large populations, seemed to link high cholesterol diets to heart disease. Public warnings soon followed. In 1961, the American Heart Association recommended that people reduce cholesterol consumption and eventually set a limit of 300 milligrams a day. (For comparison, the yolk of a single egg has about 200 milligrams.) Eventually, the idea that cholesterol is harmful so permeated the country's consciousness that marketers advertised their foods on the basis of "no cholesterol." What Anitschkov and the other early scientists may not have foreseen is how complicated the science of cholesterol and heart disease could turn out: that the body creates cholesterol in amounts much larger than their diet provides, that the body regulates how much is in the blood and that there is both “good” and “bad” cholesterol. Adding to the complexity, the way people process cholesterol differs. Scientists say some people -- about 25 percent -- appear to be more vulnerable to cholesterol-rich diets. “It’s turned out to be more complicated than anyone could have known,” said Lawrence Rudel, a professor at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine. As a graduate student at the University of Arkansas in the late 1960s, Rudel came across Anitschkov’s paper and decided to focus on understanding one of its curiosities. In passing, the paper noted that while the cholesterol diet harmed rabbits, it had no effect on white rats. In fact, if Anitschkov had focused on any other animal besides the rabbit, the effects wouldn't have been so clear -- rabbits are unusually vulnerable to the high-cholesterol diet. “The reason for the difference -- why does one animal fall apart on the cholesterol diet -- seemed like something that could be figured out,” Rudel said. “That was 40 or so years ago. We still don’t know what explains the difference.” In truth, scientists have made some progress. Rudel and his colleagues have been able to breed squirrel monkeys that are more vulnerable to the cholesterol diet. That and other evidence leads to their belief that for some people -- as for the squirrel monkeys -- genetics are to blame. Rudel said that Americans should still be warned about cholesterol. “Eggs are a nearly perfect food, but cholesterol is a potential bad guy,” he said. “Eating too much a day won’t harm everyone, but it will harm some people.” Scientists have estimated that, even without counting the toll from obesity, disease related to poor eating habits kills more than half a million people every year. That toll is often used as an argument for more research in nutrition. Currently, the National Institutes of Health spends about $1.5 billion annually on nutrition research, an amount that represents about 5 percent of its total budget. The turnaround on cholesterol, some critics say, is just more evidence that nutrition science needs more investment. Others, however, say the reversal might be seen as a sign of progress. “These reversals in the field do make us wonder and scratch our heads,” said David Allison, a public health professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “But in science, change is normal and expected.” When our view of the cosmos shifted from Ptolemy to Copernicus to Newton and Einstein, Allison said, “the reaction was not to say, ‘Oh my gosh, something is wrong with physics!’ We say, ‘Oh my gosh, isn’t this cool?’ ” Allison said the problem in nutrition stems from the arrogance that sometimes accompanies dietary advice. A little humility could go a long way. “Where nutrition has some trouble,” he said, “is all the confidence and vitriol and moralism that goes along with our recommendations.” Did the government’s dietary guidelines help make us fat? A local's guide to Mumbai, India 5 simple Indian recipes to make at home Scientists have figured out what makes Indian food so delicious Ghee has been an Indian staple for millennia. Now the rest of the world is catching on. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2015/02/10/feds-poised-to-withdraw-longstanding-warnings-about-dietary-cholesterol/?utm_term=.1982832f86fa
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  • The Presidential Advisor Who Introduced Epstein to Clinton Found Dead By Hanging With Gunshot Wound to Chest
    By Vigilant Citizen June 14, 2022
    leadmiddleton The Presidential Advisor Who Introduced Epstein to Clinton Found Dead By Hanging With Gunshot Wound to Chest
    As you probably know, Jeffrey Epstein was a billionaire child trafficker whose 2019 arrest, incarceration, and highly anticipated trial threatened to expose the elite’s sick tendencies. The flight logs of his infamous Lolita Express (the private jet used to transport guests and victims to Epstein’s private island) is a who’s who of the global elite: Politicians, celebrities, scientists, financiers, members of royal families, etc. Dozens of prominent people embarked on the Lolita Express and possibly engaged in unspeakable acts with the young victims that were trafficked by Epstein throughout the years. Bill Clinton boarded that plane over 20 times.

    But that long-awaited trial never took place. Epstein was found dead in his cell in mysterious circumstances. And, since then, several individuals who were close to Epstein also died in mysterious circumstances. For instance, in 2020, Hollywood producer Steve Bing (who was close with Jeffrey Epstein and Bill Clinton) died after falling off the 27th floor of his apartment building. While the official cause of death is “suicide”, some claim that he was killed “Russian-mafia style” because he knew too much (read my article about him here).

    Last February, Jean-Luc Brunel – the fashion agent who procured over 1,000 girls for Epstein – was found dead hanging in his jail cell. Again, the official cause of death was deemed suicide. Again, observers believe that he might have been killed because he knew too much.

    And that list of bizarre deaths keeps growing. On May 7th, Bill Clinton’s former presidential advisor Mark Middleton was found dead in the most bizarre of circumstances.

    Extension Cord

    markmiddleton e1655210633404 The Presidential Advisor Who Introduced Epstein to Clinton Found Dead By Hanging With Gunshot Wound to Chest
    Mark Middleton 0n the website of his HVAC company.
    Mark Middleton was a former presidential advisor to Bill Clinton and the financial director of his presidential campaign. He is said to have introduced Clinton to Jeffrey Epstein as he personally invited the billionaire at least seven times to the White House. Middleton also boarded Epstein’s jet multiple times.

    Despite Middleton’s great influence on the President, his career at the White House ended on a sour note.

    “Middleton left the White House in February 1995 and was accused of setting himself up as an international deal-maker, exactly the kind of person that would appeal to Epstein.

    In 1996 an investigation by the White House found that Middleton had abused his access to impress business clients and he was barred from the executive mansion without senior approval.”
    – Daily Mail, Family of Bill Clinton advisor who admitted Jeffrey Epstein into White House seven times has blocked release of files detailing the death scene

    On May 7th, 2022, Middleton died suddenly at age 59. He was found hanging from a tree with a cheap Dollar Store-type extension cord around his neck and a gunshot wound to his chest. According to authorities, Middleton trespassed on Heifer Ranch (which was located about 30 miles from his house) and used a table to construct makeshift gallows.

    Perry County Sheriff Scott Montgomery told Daily Mail:

    “I don’t know the man, and I don’t why he picked our county or picked that location to commit suicide. To our knowledge, he had never been there before, and we have no record of him being there before.

    He died from a self-inflicted shotgun wound to the chest. He found a tree and he pulled a table over there, and he got on that table, and he took an extension cord and put it around a limb, put it around his neck and he shot himself in the chest with a shotgun.

    It was very evident that the shotgun worked because there was not a lot of blood or anything on the scene. You can tell the shotgun blast was on his chest, you can tell that because there is a hole in the chest and pellets came out the back of his back. It was definitely self-inflicted in our opinion.”

    According to the sheriff, Middleton was “depressed”.

    Despite lots of unanswered questions, the death was quickly determined to be a suicide. Furthermore, the sheriff stopped speaking with the press due to the fact that the Middleton family filed a lawsuit preventing the release of information regarding this case. The lawsuit states that the family has “a privacy interest in preventing any ‘photographs, videos, sketches (or) other illustrative content’ from the death scene being released”, claiming that this material would lead to “outlandish, hurtful, unsupported and offensive articles’ being published online”.

    This lawsuit did not prevent people close to Middleton from voicing concerns. A business associate of Middleton is now calling for an independent investigation as he cannot believe that the man committed suicide. In an interview with RadarOnline, the associated stated:

    “Everyone that I know here, that has worked with Mark, knows it is physically impossible for Mark to have killed himself.”

    The associate also stated that Middleton dealt with companies close to the Clintons.

    Middleton was actively engaged in financial investments with the same Little Rock characters who allegedly worked with John Glasgow, the chief financial officer of CDI Contractors Inc., the lead firm that constructed the Clinton library.

    Glasgow vanished without a trace in 2008 after reporting financial irregularities with the Clinton library construction costs and his skeletal remains were found at Petit Jean State Park in 2015. His cause of death is undetermined.”
    – Ibid.

    While this story is already incredibly suspicious, it gets worse. A woman linked to Middleton was found dead in a river with a similar extension cord.

    Ashley Haynes

    2022 06 14 09 06 58 e1655212053877 The Presidential Advisor Who Introduced Epstein to Clinton Found Dead By Hanging With Gunshot Wound to Chest

    Haynes was a mother of two from the Little Rock suburb of Maumelle. She vanished on January 12th, after leaving a note on her kitchen counter stating “on the water, love you all.”

    After a massive search, her corpse was discovered four days later by a family friend … submerged in 10 feet of water. The police report stated:

    “Mrs. Haynes had a bag strapped to her leg with a green extension cord. Inside the bag was a large concrete block that measured 16x16x4.”

    Once again, people close to Haynes cannot believe this woman committed suicide in such a matter.

    A source close to Haynes, who worked for a charitable group to feed and clothe the homeless, tells Radar the 110-pound former model turned yoga teacher, would have never taken her own life – let alone paddleboard down the river lugging a 58-pound concrete suicide block!

    “It didn’t make any sense, she would never kill herself,” the Haynes source said. “When I heard she went missing I knew instantly it was foul play. I don’t believe she killed herself. How could she water paddle down the river with a concrete block!”
    – Ibid.

    Months prior, Haynes was seen in Mark Middleton’s office to discuss an urgent matter.

    “I saw her in Mark’s office!” the business associate tells RadarOnline.com. “I was leaving and he (Middleton) was telling me that he had a very important financial meeting – and that’s the woman who came in!”

    “I don’t know if there is anything connection there or not, but I know that it was shocking to me to hear she drowns while paddling in the Arkansas River,” the source said. “Then Mark mysteriously dies a few months later?”
    – Ibid.

    Just like Middleton, Haynes was said to be “depressed” and her death was determined to be “suicide” by investigators, even though neither of them left a suicide note.

    In Conclusion

    Weeks before the death of Jeffrey Epstein, I wrote that he might end up “suicided” because his trial could potentially expose some of the dark secrets of the global elite. Since then, several prominent people linked to Epstein and Clinton appear to have been “suicided” as well. When one analyzes the circumstances surrounding each death, a pattern emerges: No suicide note, no in-depth investigation, and little to no media coverage.

    The death of Mark Middleton fits right into this pattern. The man who introduced Epstein to Clinton was found hanging with a gunshot wound to his chest … and it was quickly deemed a suicide. Furthermore, any kind of investigation relating to the case has been cut short.

    Despite this fact, there’s one all-important detail that strongly hints at a non-suicide: The usage of a Dollar-store extension cord. Why would anyone who is adamant about committing suicide by hanging use a cheaply made, plastic extension cord instead of actual rope? Furthermore, why would a 100-pound woman use the same type of extension cord to attach her leg to a 58-pound concrete block? It simply does not add up.

    If these two individuals were actually “suicided”, the extension cord becomes a code left by the perpetrators. First, this bizarre prop links both deaths in a rather unequivocal matter. Furthermore, the power cord itself might symbolize the reason why they were “suicided”. Maybe it’s because they were both too close to … power.
    The Presidential Advisor Who Introduced Epstein to Clinton Found Dead By Hanging With Gunshot Wound to Chest By Vigilant Citizen June 14, 2022 leadmiddleton The Presidential Advisor Who Introduced Epstein to Clinton Found Dead By Hanging With Gunshot Wound to Chest As you probably know, Jeffrey Epstein was a billionaire child trafficker whose 2019 arrest, incarceration, and highly anticipated trial threatened to expose the elite’s sick tendencies. The flight logs of his infamous Lolita Express (the private jet used to transport guests and victims to Epstein’s private island) is a who’s who of the global elite: Politicians, celebrities, scientists, financiers, members of royal families, etc. Dozens of prominent people embarked on the Lolita Express and possibly engaged in unspeakable acts with the young victims that were trafficked by Epstein throughout the years. Bill Clinton boarded that plane over 20 times. But that long-awaited trial never took place. Epstein was found dead in his cell in mysterious circumstances. And, since then, several individuals who were close to Epstein also died in mysterious circumstances. For instance, in 2020, Hollywood producer Steve Bing (who was close with Jeffrey Epstein and Bill Clinton) died after falling off the 27th floor of his apartment building. While the official cause of death is “suicide”, some claim that he was killed “Russian-mafia style” because he knew too much (read my article about him here). Last February, Jean-Luc Brunel – the fashion agent who procured over 1,000 girls for Epstein – was found dead hanging in his jail cell. Again, the official cause of death was deemed suicide. Again, observers believe that he might have been killed because he knew too much. And that list of bizarre deaths keeps growing. On May 7th, Bill Clinton’s former presidential advisor Mark Middleton was found dead in the most bizarre of circumstances. Extension Cord markmiddleton e1655210633404 The Presidential Advisor Who Introduced Epstein to Clinton Found Dead By Hanging With Gunshot Wound to Chest Mark Middleton 0n the website of his HVAC company. Mark Middleton was a former presidential advisor to Bill Clinton and the financial director of his presidential campaign. He is said to have introduced Clinton to Jeffrey Epstein as he personally invited the billionaire at least seven times to the White House. Middleton also boarded Epstein’s jet multiple times. Despite Middleton’s great influence on the President, his career at the White House ended on a sour note. “Middleton left the White House in February 1995 and was accused of setting himself up as an international deal-maker, exactly the kind of person that would appeal to Epstein. In 1996 an investigation by the White House found that Middleton had abused his access to impress business clients and he was barred from the executive mansion without senior approval.” – Daily Mail, Family of Bill Clinton advisor who admitted Jeffrey Epstein into White House seven times has blocked release of files detailing the death scene On May 7th, 2022, Middleton died suddenly at age 59. He was found hanging from a tree with a cheap Dollar Store-type extension cord around his neck and a gunshot wound to his chest. According to authorities, Middleton trespassed on Heifer Ranch (which was located about 30 miles from his house) and used a table to construct makeshift gallows. Perry County Sheriff Scott Montgomery told Daily Mail: “I don’t know the man, and I don’t why he picked our county or picked that location to commit suicide. To our knowledge, he had never been there before, and we have no record of him being there before. He died from a self-inflicted shotgun wound to the chest. He found a tree and he pulled a table over there, and he got on that table, and he took an extension cord and put it around a limb, put it around his neck and he shot himself in the chest with a shotgun. It was very evident that the shotgun worked because there was not a lot of blood or anything on the scene. You can tell the shotgun blast was on his chest, you can tell that because there is a hole in the chest and pellets came out the back of his back. It was definitely self-inflicted in our opinion.” According to the sheriff, Middleton was “depressed”. Despite lots of unanswered questions, the death was quickly determined to be a suicide. Furthermore, the sheriff stopped speaking with the press due to the fact that the Middleton family filed a lawsuit preventing the release of information regarding this case. The lawsuit states that the family has “a privacy interest in preventing any ‘photographs, videos, sketches (or) other illustrative content’ from the death scene being released”, claiming that this material would lead to “outlandish, hurtful, unsupported and offensive articles’ being published online”. This lawsuit did not prevent people close to Middleton from voicing concerns. A business associate of Middleton is now calling for an independent investigation as he cannot believe that the man committed suicide. In an interview with RadarOnline, the associated stated: “Everyone that I know here, that has worked with Mark, knows it is physically impossible for Mark to have killed himself.” The associate also stated that Middleton dealt with companies close to the Clintons. Middleton was actively engaged in financial investments with the same Little Rock characters who allegedly worked with John Glasgow, the chief financial officer of CDI Contractors Inc., the lead firm that constructed the Clinton library. Glasgow vanished without a trace in 2008 after reporting financial irregularities with the Clinton library construction costs and his skeletal remains were found at Petit Jean State Park in 2015. His cause of death is undetermined.” – Ibid. While this story is already incredibly suspicious, it gets worse. A woman linked to Middleton was found dead in a river with a similar extension cord. Ashley Haynes 2022 06 14 09 06 58 e1655212053877 The Presidential Advisor Who Introduced Epstein to Clinton Found Dead By Hanging With Gunshot Wound to Chest Haynes was a mother of two from the Little Rock suburb of Maumelle. She vanished on January 12th, after leaving a note on her kitchen counter stating “on the water, love you all.” After a massive search, her corpse was discovered four days later by a family friend … submerged in 10 feet of water. The police report stated: “Mrs. Haynes had a bag strapped to her leg with a green extension cord. Inside the bag was a large concrete block that measured 16x16x4.” Once again, people close to Haynes cannot believe this woman committed suicide in such a matter. A source close to Haynes, who worked for a charitable group to feed and clothe the homeless, tells Radar the 110-pound former model turned yoga teacher, would have never taken her own life – let alone paddleboard down the river lugging a 58-pound concrete suicide block! “It didn’t make any sense, she would never kill herself,” the Haynes source said. “When I heard she went missing I knew instantly it was foul play. I don’t believe she killed herself. How could she water paddle down the river with a concrete block!” – Ibid. Months prior, Haynes was seen in Mark Middleton’s office to discuss an urgent matter. “I saw her in Mark’s office!” the business associate tells RadarOnline.com. “I was leaving and he (Middleton) was telling me that he had a very important financial meeting – and that’s the woman who came in!” “I don’t know if there is anything connection there or not, but I know that it was shocking to me to hear she drowns while paddling in the Arkansas River,” the source said. “Then Mark mysteriously dies a few months later?” – Ibid. Just like Middleton, Haynes was said to be “depressed” and her death was determined to be “suicide” by investigators, even though neither of them left a suicide note. In Conclusion Weeks before the death of Jeffrey Epstein, I wrote that he might end up “suicided” because his trial could potentially expose some of the dark secrets of the global elite. Since then, several prominent people linked to Epstein and Clinton appear to have been “suicided” as well. When one analyzes the circumstances surrounding each death, a pattern emerges: No suicide note, no in-depth investigation, and little to no media coverage. The death of Mark Middleton fits right into this pattern. The man who introduced Epstein to Clinton was found hanging with a gunshot wound to his chest … and it was quickly deemed a suicide. Furthermore, any kind of investigation relating to the case has been cut short. Despite this fact, there’s one all-important detail that strongly hints at a non-suicide: The usage of a Dollar-store extension cord. Why would anyone who is adamant about committing suicide by hanging use a cheaply made, plastic extension cord instead of actual rope? Furthermore, why would a 100-pound woman use the same type of extension cord to attach her leg to a 58-pound concrete block? It simply does not add up. If these two individuals were actually “suicided”, the extension cord becomes a code left by the perpetrators. First, this bizarre prop links both deaths in a rather unequivocal matter. Furthermore, the power cord itself might symbolize the reason why they were “suicided”. Maybe it’s because they were both too close to … power.
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  • Arkansas Governor Signs Senate Bill 1718, Reaffirming #Gold and #Silver as Legal Tender and Removing All Tax Liability from the Monetary Metals.
    Arkansas Governor Signs Senate Bill 1718, Reaffirming #Gold and #Silver as Legal Tender and Removing All Tax Liability from the Monetary Metals.
    WWW.ACTIVISTPOST.COM
    Arkansas Passes Legal Tender Act, Removes Taxes on Gold and Silver - Activist Post
    Ending income / capital gains taxes on precious metals sales is becoming more popular.
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  • This is our #freecampsite where I decided to get a #pontoonboat. The area is called #BoggyPointCove and is in North Central #Arkansas on a body of water called #NorforkLake. We've since returned and met quite a few cool people from the area.

    Who can beat a lake view campsite for free with a boat launch right there.

    #someeoriginals #originalcontent #hiking #trail #travel #photography #myphoto #LandscapePhotography #nature #scenery #recreation #adventure #boating #watersports #freecampsites
    This is our #freecampsite where I decided to get a #pontoonboat. The area is called #BoggyPointCove and is in North Central #Arkansas on a body of water called #NorforkLake. We've since returned and met quite a few cool people from the area. Who can beat a lake view campsite for free with a boat launch right there. #someeoriginals #originalcontent #hiking #trail #travel #photography #myphoto #LandscapePhotography #nature #scenery #recreation #adventure #boating #watersports #freecampsites
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  • Last year when we went on a multi-state Morrel hunt, we happened upon this free campsite called #BoggyCove on #NorforkLake in #Arkansas. The campsites were right at the lake with a boat launch. It was here that I mentioned wanting a #pontoon boat, because I need the stability these days. Later on that summer AlphaHippie hit the web and found a great deal.

    We bought the boat and the first place we launched it was where the idea was born. Norfork Lake is a dammed river that creates a #reservoir. It's 60 some miles long and a great place to get away for a few days. I'm starting to get cabin feaver and can't wait to get back out on the road and water.


    #someeoriginals #originalcontent #Awesme #RVing #roadtrippin #boondocking #camping #freecampsites #hiking #trail #travel #photography #myphoto #LandscapePhotography #nature #scenery #boating
    Last year when we went on a multi-state Morrel hunt, we happened upon this free campsite called #BoggyCove on #NorforkLake in #Arkansas. The campsites were right at the lake with a boat launch. It was here that I mentioned wanting a #pontoon boat, because I need the stability these days. Later on that summer [AlphaHippie] hit the web and found a great deal. We bought the boat and the first place we launched it was where the idea was born. Norfork Lake is a dammed river that creates a #reservoir. It's 60 some miles long and a great place to get away for a few days. I'm starting to get cabin feaver and can't wait to get back out on the road and water. #someeoriginals #originalcontent #Awesme #RVing #roadtrippin #boondocking #camping #freecampsites #hiking #trail #travel #photography #myphoto #LandscapePhotography #nature #scenery #boating
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  • Did Georgia buy a National Title???
    The Bulldogs are back to back, 2021 and 2022, Champions!

    2019 Power Five Recruiting Spending Ranked
    Georgia – $3,676,858
    Alabama – $2,663,467
    Tennessee – $2,247,289
    Clemson – $2,234,173
    Arkansas – $1,931,026
    Texas A&M – $1,673,204
    LSU – $1,607,148
    Penn State – $1,529,068
    Florida State – $1,503,142
    Michigan – $1,411,989
    Did Georgia buy a National Title??? The Bulldogs are back to back, 2021 and 2022, Champions! 2019 Power Five Recruiting Spending Ranked Georgia – $3,676,858 Alabama – $2,663,467 Tennessee – $2,247,289 Clemson – $2,234,173 Arkansas – $1,931,026 Texas A&M – $1,673,204 LSU – $1,607,148 Penn State – $1,529,068 Florida State – $1,503,142 Michigan – $1,411,989
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  • Traveled to Arkansas today to help move stuff from the nicest Christian lady I've met doing this job. Her name is Sue and we helped her move her granddaughter Claire's stuff to California.
    I had some pretty good conversations with her while I was moving her granddaughter's furniture and loading the Truck.
    When we were done loading the Truck and ready to leave, She gave Adam my worker and I some good tips and prayed to Jesus for our Safety. She also told me that we would meet again. I affirmed that. God willing we cross paths again. I enjoyed today a lot.
    Traveled to Arkansas today to help move stuff from the nicest Christian lady I've met doing this job. Her name is Sue and we helped her move her granddaughter Claire's stuff to California. I had some pretty good conversations with her while I was moving her granddaughter's furniture and loading the Truck. When we were done loading the Truck and ready to leave, She gave Adam my worker and I some good tips and prayed to Jesus for our Safety. She also told me that we would meet again. I affirmed that. God willing we cross paths again. I enjoyed today a lot.
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