• RT - World’s largest iceberg heads towards site of Titanic tragedy:

    https://www.rt.com/news/587982-worlds-biggest-iceberg-drifting-titanic/

    #Iceberg #A23a #WeddellSea #Geophysics #Glaciology #Oceanography
    RT - World’s largest iceberg heads towards site of Titanic tragedy: https://www.rt.com/news/587982-worlds-biggest-iceberg-drifting-titanic/ #Iceberg #A23a #WeddellSea #Geophysics #Glaciology #Oceanography
    WWW.RT.COM
    World’s largest iceberg heads towards site of Titanic tragedy
    The world’s largest iceberg is moving for the first time in 37 years after breaking free from the ocean floor, scientists have said
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    #history #titanic #someeofficial #cent #archon #hive #ecency
    It was a cold September morning in 1985 when a team of scientists, led by Dr. Robert Ballard, set sail on a groundbreaking expedition. Their mission was to locate and document the final resting place of the RMS Titanic, the legendary ocean liner that had tragically sunk on its maiden voyage in 1912. The Titanic had long captured the imagination of the world, and finding its wreckage would be a significant feat of underwater exploration.
    Equipped with advanced sonar technology and remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), the team embarked on an arduous journey to the North Atlantic Ocean. Their search area spanned hundreds of square miles, where the Titanic was believed to have sunk after striking an iceberg. The challenge was immense, as they were faced with vast depths, treacherous conditions, and the unknown.
    Days turned into weeks as the team tirelessly scanned the ocean floor, mapping the seabed and meticulously examining sonar readings. It was a painstaking process of elimination, ruling out false targets and navigating through the darkness of the deep sea. The team faced setbacks, battling rough weather and technical difficulties, but their determination to unravel history's greatest maritime tragedy never wavered.
    Then, on September 1, 1985, a breakthrough occurred. As the sonar scan swept across the seabed, a promising image materialized on the screens. It was a large object, distinct and recognizable. The excitement on board was palpable, and the team knew they were on the brink of a historic discovery.
    With cautious anticipation, the ROVs were deployed to descend into the depths and investigate the mysterious object. Cameras mounted on the ROVs transmitted live footage back to the research vessel, and as the screens flickered to life, an astonishing sight unfolded before their eyes. The Titanic, or what remained of it, emerged from the darkness—an eerie silhouette resting on the ocean floor.
    The scene was both haunting and awe-inspiring. The once grand vessel now lay in fragments, its steel hull rusted and decaying. The ship's iconic bow and stern sections, separated by over a third of a mile, revealed the magnitude of the Titanic's catastrophic demise. Debris scattered across the seabed—lifeboats, furniture, and personal belongings—offered a haunting glimpse into the lives of those aboard.
    Over subsequent weeks and months, the team meticulously documented the wreckage, capturing detailed photographs and video footage of the Titanic's remains. The discoveries were not limited to the ship's exterior; they also explored the interior spaces, revealing the remnants of luxurious cabins, grand staircases, and other poignant reminders of the lives lost.
    The findings from this groundbreaking expedition provided valuable insights into the Titanic's final moments and shed light on the circumstances surrounding its sinking. The discoveries also fueled public fascination, leading to renewed interest in the story of the Titanic and the lives forever changed by the tragedy.
    The search for the Titanic was not just an expedition to locate a ship; it was a quest to unravel a piece of history. The dedication and perseverance of the team led to one of the most remarkable discoveries of the 20th century, immortalizing the Titanic in our collective memory and providing a deeper understanding of this iconic shipwreck.
    Today, the legacy of the Titanic lives on, reminding us of the fragility of human endeavors and the profound impact of tragic events. The discovery of the Titanic stands as a testament to the indomitable spirit of exploration, the relentless pursuit of knowledge, and the ability of humanity to uncover and preserve the stories of the past.
    Image Source #history #titanic #someeofficial #cent #archon #hive #ecency It was a cold September morning in 1985 when a team of scientists, led by Dr. Robert Ballard, set sail on a groundbreaking expedition. Their mission was to locate and document the final resting place of the RMS Titanic, the legendary ocean liner that had tragically sunk on its maiden voyage in 1912. The Titanic had long captured the imagination of the world, and finding its wreckage would be a significant feat of underwater exploration. Equipped with advanced sonar technology and remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), the team embarked on an arduous journey to the North Atlantic Ocean. Their search area spanned hundreds of square miles, where the Titanic was believed to have sunk after striking an iceberg. The challenge was immense, as they were faced with vast depths, treacherous conditions, and the unknown. Days turned into weeks as the team tirelessly scanned the ocean floor, mapping the seabed and meticulously examining sonar readings. It was a painstaking process of elimination, ruling out false targets and navigating through the darkness of the deep sea. The team faced setbacks, battling rough weather and technical difficulties, but their determination to unravel history's greatest maritime tragedy never wavered. Then, on September 1, 1985, a breakthrough occurred. As the sonar scan swept across the seabed, a promising image materialized on the screens. It was a large object, distinct and recognizable. The excitement on board was palpable, and the team knew they were on the brink of a historic discovery. With cautious anticipation, the ROVs were deployed to descend into the depths and investigate the mysterious object. Cameras mounted on the ROVs transmitted live footage back to the research vessel, and as the screens flickered to life, an astonishing sight unfolded before their eyes. The Titanic, or what remained of it, emerged from the darkness—an eerie silhouette resting on the ocean floor. The scene was both haunting and awe-inspiring. The once grand vessel now lay in fragments, its steel hull rusted and decaying. The ship's iconic bow and stern sections, separated by over a third of a mile, revealed the magnitude of the Titanic's catastrophic demise. Debris scattered across the seabed—lifeboats, furniture, and personal belongings—offered a haunting glimpse into the lives of those aboard. Over subsequent weeks and months, the team meticulously documented the wreckage, capturing detailed photographs and video footage of the Titanic's remains. The discoveries were not limited to the ship's exterior; they also explored the interior spaces, revealing the remnants of luxurious cabins, grand staircases, and other poignant reminders of the lives lost. The findings from this groundbreaking expedition provided valuable insights into the Titanic's final moments and shed light on the circumstances surrounding its sinking. The discoveries also fueled public fascination, leading to renewed interest in the story of the Titanic and the lives forever changed by the tragedy. The search for the Titanic was not just an expedition to locate a ship; it was a quest to unravel a piece of history. The dedication and perseverance of the team led to one of the most remarkable discoveries of the 20th century, immortalizing the Titanic in our collective memory and providing a deeper understanding of this iconic shipwreck. Today, the legacy of the Titanic lives on, reminding us of the fragility of human endeavors and the profound impact of tragic events. The discovery of the Titanic stands as a testament to the indomitable spirit of exploration, the relentless pursuit of knowledge, and the ability of humanity to uncover and preserve the stories of the past.
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  • Julius Caesar's assassination (March 15, 44 BCE): A lunar eclipse occurred on March 13, 44 BCE, two days before the assassination, which Romans believed was a bad omen.

    Battle of Hastings (October 14, 1066): This decisive battle happened one day after a lunar eclipse on October 13, 1066, and was considered an omen by astrologers.

    Battle of Waterloo (June 18, 1815): A lunar eclipse took place two days before this battle on June 16, 1815, which marked the end of the Napoleonic Wars.

    California Gold Rush (January 24, 1848): A lunar eclipse occurred on January 27, 1848, three days after the discovery of gold at Sutter's Mill, sparking the Gold Rush.

    U.S. Civil War begins (April 12, 1861): A lunar eclipse happened two days prior, on April 10, 1861, before the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter.

    Abraham Lincoln's assassination (April 14, 1865): Lincoln was assassinated three days before a lunar eclipse on April 17, 1865.

    Titanic sinking (April 15, 1912): The Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg, and a lunar eclipse occurred three days prior, on April 12, 1912.

    Archduke Franz Ferdinand's assassination (June 28, 1914): This event triggered World War I, and a lunar eclipse occurred three days before, on June 25, 1914.

    Atomic bombing of Hiroshima (August 6, 1945): The U.S. dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, with a lunar eclipse taking place two days prior, on August 4, 1945.

    Apollo 11 Moon Landing (July 20, 1969): The lunar eclipse on July 18, 1969, preceded the successful moon landing by two days.

    Fall of the Berlin Wall (November 9, 1989): A lunar eclipse occurred on November 7, 1989, two days before the fall of the wall.

    9/11 Terrorist Attacks (September 11, 2001): A lunar eclipse took place three days prior, on September 8, 2001.

    COVID-19 Pandemic (declared on March 11, 2020): A lunar eclipse occurred three days after the pandemic declaration, on March 14, 2020.


    original post from @wstickevers, twitter
    Julius Caesar's assassination (March 15, 44 BCE): A lunar eclipse occurred on March 13, 44 BCE, two days before the assassination, which Romans believed was a bad omen. Battle of Hastings (October 14, 1066): This decisive battle happened one day after a lunar eclipse on October 13, 1066, and was considered an omen by astrologers. Battle of Waterloo (June 18, 1815): A lunar eclipse took place two days before this battle on June 16, 1815, which marked the end of the Napoleonic Wars. California Gold Rush (January 24, 1848): A lunar eclipse occurred on January 27, 1848, three days after the discovery of gold at Sutter's Mill, sparking the Gold Rush. U.S. Civil War begins (April 12, 1861): A lunar eclipse happened two days prior, on April 10, 1861, before the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter. Abraham Lincoln's assassination (April 14, 1865): Lincoln was assassinated three days before a lunar eclipse on April 17, 1865. Titanic sinking (April 15, 1912): The Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg, and a lunar eclipse occurred three days prior, on April 12, 1912. Archduke Franz Ferdinand's assassination (June 28, 1914): This event triggered World War I, and a lunar eclipse occurred three days before, on June 25, 1914. Atomic bombing of Hiroshima (August 6, 1945): The U.S. dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, with a lunar eclipse taking place two days prior, on August 4, 1945. Apollo 11 Moon Landing (July 20, 1969): The lunar eclipse on July 18, 1969, preceded the successful moon landing by two days. Fall of the Berlin Wall (November 9, 1989): A lunar eclipse occurred on November 7, 1989, two days before the fall of the wall. 9/11 Terrorist Attacks (September 11, 2001): A lunar eclipse took place three days prior, on September 8, 2001. COVID-19 Pandemic (declared on March 11, 2020): A lunar eclipse occurred three days after the pandemic declaration, on March 14, 2020. original post from @wstickevers, twitter
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  • Titanic Live: April 27th, 1912, afternoon - With nearly two weeks elapsed since the disaster, daily publications around the world are still filled to the brim constantly with further news of Titanic, trickling out in the form of passenger accounts, obituaries and tributes to the lost - and increasingly outlandish ideas for both planned salvage of the vessel and future lifesaving equipment aimed at appeasing a nervous public. Published in The Graphic today:

    “Something more than lifeboats - however large a number of these may be carried - is necessary to insure against a repetition of the Titanic disaster, and the most feasible plan seems to be to make portions of the deck detachable, and so provide rafts on which the ship’s company may escape. This scheme commends itself to so practical a seaman as Mr. Frank T. Bullen, who believes that the only practical solution to the problem is to have a large portion of the boat deck so built that it could be detached from the hull, forming a great raft capable of floating 2000 or 3000 people.”

    Needless to say, it is a scheme never put into any widespread practical use, though this and others like it will continue to fill newspapers and magazine supplements through the end of the year and beyond.

    Illustration by G.F. Morrell originally published by The Graphic, April 27th, 1912
    Titanic Live: April 27th, 1912, afternoon - With nearly two weeks elapsed since the disaster, daily publications around the world are still filled to the brim constantly with further news of Titanic, trickling out in the form of passenger accounts, obituaries and tributes to the lost - and increasingly outlandish ideas for both planned salvage of the vessel and future lifesaving equipment aimed at appeasing a nervous public. Published in The Graphic today: “Something more than lifeboats - however large a number of these may be carried - is necessary to insure against a repetition of the Titanic disaster, and the most feasible plan seems to be to make portions of the deck detachable, and so provide rafts on which the ship’s company may escape. This scheme commends itself to so practical a seaman as Mr. Frank T. Bullen, who believes that the only practical solution to the problem is to have a large portion of the boat deck so built that it could be detached from the hull, forming a great raft capable of floating 2000 or 3000 people.” Needless to say, it is a scheme never put into any widespread practical use, though this and others like it will continue to fill newspapers and magazine supplements through the end of the year and beyond. Illustration by G.F. Morrell originally published by The Graphic, April 27th, 1912
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  • ⚓️ RMS TITANIC FACT
    In 1910 the largest chain at the time was forged for the Titanic's Hingley anchor. #somee #sme #waiv #proofofbrain #cent #bro #dec #history

    ???? Haunting facts about the Titanic ???? https://youtu.be/t19ARutmxR4
    ⚓️ RMS TITANIC FACT In 1910 the largest chain at the time was forged for the Titanic's Hingley anchor. #somee #sme #waiv #proofofbrain #cent #bro #dec #history ???? Haunting facts about the Titanic ???? https://youtu.be/t19ARutmxR4
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  • On this day and this hour 111 years ago, April 10, during the busy morning board of trade representative Maurice Clark returns. He inspects the lowering of lifeboats 11 and 13, and said that the liner needed at least '50 per cent more lifeboats', while ship still had four more lifeboats than legally required. The Board of Trade regulations were badly out of date, and related to tonnage, rather than the number of people aboard.

    The last of the cargo is loaded, and at 9:30 passengers start to board RMS Titanic .

    ???? - Father Browne from the first class gangway.

    #Titanic2023 #RMSTitanic #TitanicMemorialMonth #Titanic111 #HistoricShipsNetwork #somee #someeofficial #pay #cent #sbt
    On this day and this hour 111 years ago, April 10, during the busy morning board of trade representative Maurice Clark returns. He inspects the lowering of lifeboats 11 and 13, and said that the liner needed at least '50 per cent more lifeboats', while ship still had four more lifeboats than legally required. The Board of Trade regulations were badly out of date, and related to tonnage, rather than the number of people aboard. The last of the cargo is loaded, and at 9:30 passengers start to board RMS Titanic . ???? - Father Browne from the first class gangway. #Titanic2023 #RMSTitanic #TitanicMemorialMonth #Titanic111 #HistoricShipsNetwork #somee #someeofficial #pay #cent #sbt
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  • Colorized photo of Ned Parfett, best known as the “Titanic paperboy” April 16, 1912. Photographer unknown.

    #Titanic #historycolored #history
    Colorized photo of Ned Parfett, best known as the “Titanic paperboy” April 16, 1912. Photographer unknown. #Titanic #historycolored #history
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  • If the Trans community existed back during the Titanic, this would most definitely happen.
    If the Trans community existed back during the Titanic, this would most definitely happen.
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  • The Grand Staircase of Titanic, 1912
    The Grand Staircase of Titanic, 1912
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  • Last photo taken of the Titanic.
    Last photo taken of the Titanic.
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  • Titanic????
    Titanic????
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