• Attraction Bundle .

    Many men find it difficult to seduce a woman. Too many blockages have built up over the years that make charisma, self-confidence and relaxed interactions with women difficult.
    http://energetic-eternity.de/produkt/attraction-bundle/#aff=sarafraz
    Approximately 90-95% of communication between women and men takes place on a subconscious level. It is the unconscious signals that control us and make male attraction to women possible.

    The Attraction Bundle gives you a masculine-erotic attraction to women in combination with overwhelming charisma and a good dose of self-confidence. Have fun.
    Attraction Bundle . Many men find it difficult to seduce a woman. Too many blockages have built up over the years that make charisma, self-confidence and relaxed interactions with women difficult. http://energetic-eternity.de/produkt/attraction-bundle/#aff=sarafraz Approximately 90-95% of communication between women and men takes place on a subconscious level. It is the unconscious signals that control us and make male attraction to women possible. The Attraction Bundle gives you a masculine-erotic attraction to women in combination with overwhelming charisma and a good dose of self-confidence. Have fun.
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  • 🧠USING YOUR MENTAL ENERGY
    ✅PART 123

    Don’t accept the prior suggestions simply because it’s given to you.

    Think it over carefully, until the impression is made upon your own #subconscious #mind understandingly.

    Rise every morning, as was suggested before, sit in a quiet room in a straight back chair & think at the affirmation of the previous evening, & you should realize & be able to put in practice your princely power.
    🧠USING YOUR MENTAL ENERGY ✅PART 123 Don’t accept the prior suggestions simply because it’s given to you. Think it over carefully, until the impression is made upon your own #subconscious #mind understandingly. Rise every morning, as was suggested before, sit in a quiet room in a straight back chair & think at the affirmation of the previous evening, & you should realize & be able to put in practice your princely power.
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  • 8 Tips To Prepare For Ramadan in Rajab
    Let's prepare for Ramadan in Rajab, one of the four sacred months in Islam.

    What to do in Rajab

    Tips to prepare for Ramadan fasting, Rejab, Rajab

    “I want to do better this year and reap all the rewards that I can!” are some of the thoughts we often try to achieve as we look into the remaining days before Ramadan. The challenge is to stay motivated and retain consistency. Some of us tend to feel unmotivated as early as the first week of Ramadan.

    Have you ever gone through that cycle every year and wondered why is it difficult to stay motivated along the way, just to find yourself regretting it in the end?

    It is nevertheless a good move to want to do something great during Ramadan. However, like any other battle, we have to plan and strategise to enter it fully prepared. There is a saying that goes; “If you fail to plan, you plan to fail” and Rajab is one of the best times to start preparing for Ramadan.

    Rajab is one of the four sacred months, other than Zulkaedah, Zulhijjah and Muharram. Allah s.w.t. mentions in Surah At-Tawbah:

    إِنَّ عِدَّةَ الشُّهورِ عِندَ اللَّهِ اثنا عَشَرَ شَهرًا في كِتابِ اللَّهِ يَومَ خَلَقَ السَّماواتِ وَالأَرضَ مِنها أَربَعَةٌ حُرُمٌ

    “Indeed, the number of months ordained by Allah is twelve—in Allah’s record since the day He created the heavens and the earth—of which four are sacred.”

    (Surah At-Tawbah, 9:36)

    Read: 4 Sacred Months in Islam

    The classical Muslim scholar Ibn Rajab al-Hanbali quoted another scholar, Abu Bakr Al-Warraq, in his book Lataif al-Ma’arif:

    “Rajab is a month of cultivation, Syaaban is the month of irrigating the fields, and Ramadan is the month of reaping and harvesting.”

    This means that with the proper preparation and effort particularly in the month of Rajab, achieving the best Ramadan experience yet can be a possibility by Allah's Will.

    Read: Rajab: The Forgotten Sacred Month

    Thus, in order to achieve the goals you set, preparation has to start now. So here are 8 simple steps that you can follow to prepare for Ramadan:

    1. Prepare A Checklist

    Prepare a checklist for Ramadan, Rejab, Rajab Yes, you read it correctly. You have to write down your goals instead of relying solely on a mental checklist. Pen down your checklist of what you would like to achieve in Ramadan.

    By doing so, you are subconsciously recording it in your mind as well. Then, hang the checklist where you can see it each and every day.

    This is to remind you of your goals constantly.

    2. Set Realistic Goals

    Set realistic goals for ramadan, Rejab, Rajab Set the goals you would like to achieve, but make sure that they are practical. It’s okay to set a goal as simple as donating or reading a page of the Quran every day. Instead of focusing on the number of pages, why not focus on the consistency of the 'Ibadah (worship)?

    The ultimate goal is to ensure the goals we set do not end here but continue beyond until we meet the next Ramadan, insyaAllah (God willing). There is a reason Islam encourages us to practise moderation in every aspect of our lives so that it will be easier for us to sustain and practise istiqomah (consistency). The Prophet s.a.w said:

    أَحَبُّ الأَعْمَالِ إِلَى اللَّهِ تَعَالَى أَدْوَمُهَا وَإِنْ قَلَّ

    “The most beloved deeds to Allah s.w.t are those which are done consistently, even if they are little,”

    (Sahih Al-Bukhari)

    3. Do Revision To Internalise The Meaning Of Ramadan

    Revise and read up on Ramadan and its meaning, Rejab, Rajab Start by reading about the virtues of Ramadan to internalise the meaning of fasting. For example, you could read about the multiple grades of fasting in Inner Dimensions of Islamic Worship, a book that consists of selections from Imam Ghazali's Ihya' 'Ulum al-Din (The Revival of Islamic Sciences).

    Read: Frequently Asked Questions During Ramadan

    Besides that, revise the supplications and other types of remembrance that we can recite during Ramadan. It will be helpful to know when and how to do these acts of worship. Finally, on Lailatul Qadar (Night of Power), it is encouraged to read the different types of Sunnah prayers during Qiyamulail (night vigil prayers) and reap the great rewards.

    Read: How To Pray Tahajjud and Perform Qiyamullail

    4. Get The Engine Running

    Do sunnah fasting to prepare for ramadan, Rejab, Rajab
    We can start with fasting voluntarily, either Monday and Thursday, or on Ayyamul Bidh (the white days of fasting), being the 13th, 14th and 15th day of every month, or any three days of the month.

    تُعْرَضُ الأَعْمَالُ يَوْمَ الاِثْنَيْنِ وَالْخَمِيسِ فَأُحِبُّ أَنْ يُعْرَضَ عَمَلِي وَأَنَا صَائِمٌ

    "Deeds are presented (before Allah) on Mondays and Thursdays, so I love that my actions be presented while I am fasting"

    (Sunan At-Tirmizi)

    The Prophet s.a.w was also reported in another hadith:

    وعنْ مُعاذةَ العَدَوِيَّةِ أَنَّها سَأَلَتْ عائشةَ رضيَ اللَّه عَنْهَا: أَكانَ رَسُولُ اللَّهِ ﷺ يصومُ مِن كُلِّ شَهرٍ ثلاثةَ أَيَّامٍ؟ قَالَت: نَعَمْ. فَقُلْتُ: منْ أَيِّ الشَّهْر كَانَ يَصُومُ؟ قَالَتْ: لَمْ يَكُن يُبَالي مِنْ أَيِّ الشَّهْرِ يَصُومُ.

    I heard Muaz say; "I asked Aisyah r.a; Did the Prophet s.a.w. fast three days each month?" She replied: "Yes," I asked: "Which days did he fast?" She replied: "He did not care on which day he fasted"

    (Sahih Muslim)

    Also, we can choose an action that we want to do consistently, such as reading verses of the Quran, waking up at night even if we managed to pray just 2 rakaat of tahajjud (night vigil prayer) just before Subuh or giving charity every Friday. Hopefully, this will become a habit, not only during Ramadan but after that as well.

    5. Prepare for Syawal

    Prepare for Hari Raya before fasting in Ramadan, Rejab, Rajab Do the major shopping or spring cleaning before we enter Ramadan so that we can give our 100 per cent of focus in Ramadan for acts of worship. It is troublesome to divide our time for Hari Raya preparation while trying to achieve the goals we have set in Ramadan.

    So why not do them now?

    6. Plan Your Meals And Work Out

    Plan your meals for Ramadan, rejab, rajab Undoubtedly, for us to be able to do these acts of worship, we need a healthy body. As the saying goes, a healthy body leads to a healthy mind. Plan your meals so that you will eat moderately and waste less. Plan your workout activities. Fasting should not be the reason to skip our exercise. Do workouts that focus on strength rather than cardio.

    7. Prepare For Your Menstruation Days

    Find out what is allowed during menstruation in islam, Rejab, Rajab Ladies, don’t despair. These days are there not for us to feel sad nor to stop all our deeds. Instead, we can increase worship. There are only a few prohibitions during this time such as fasting, praying and holding the Quran. Aside from that, we can still do zikr (words of remembrance), give charity and help to prepare sahur (breakfast) and iftar (breaking the fast).

    Read: 7 Things You Can Do If You Cannot Fast During Ramadan

    8. Make Constant Dua

    Make constant Dua to reach Ramadan, Rejab, Rajab It was narrated in Lataif al-Ma’arif by Ibn Rajab Al-Hanbali that the companions will supplicate for 6 months to allow them to reach Ramadan safely. They will then pray for another 6 months after Ramadan that may Allah accept from them their acts of worship observed in the month of Ramadan. We can recite the following doa:

    اللَّهُمَّ بَارِكْ لَنَا فِي رَجَب، وَشَعْبَانَ، وَبَلِّغْنَا رَمَضَانَ

    Allahumma barik lana fi Rajab wa Sha’ban wa ballighna Ramadan

    “O Allah make the months of Rajab and Sha’ban blessed for us and let us reach the month of Ramadan.”

    (Musnad Ahmad)

    And the Dua:

    اللَّهُمَّ سَلِّمْنِي مِنْ رَمَضَانَ، وَسَلِّمْ رَمَضَانَ لِي، وَتَسَلَّمْهُ مِنِّي مُتَقَبَّلًا

    Allahumma Sallimni min Ramadhan. Wa sallim Ramadhana li. Wa tasallamhu minni mutaqabbala

    “O Allah preserve me for Ramadan, safeguard Ramadan for me and accept it for me.”

    (narrated by Imam At-Tabrani)

    After all, it is His blessings in Ramadan that we yearn for. So in preparing to reap the rewards, let’s turn to Him and ask from the Most Giving. May Allah eases our preparation to meet the holy month this year and May Allah s.w.t accept all our deeds.



    https://muslim.sg/articles/how-to-prepare-for-ramadan

    https://donshafi911.blogspot.com/2024/02/8-tips-to-prepare-for-ramadan-in-rajab.html
    8 Tips To Prepare For Ramadan in Rajab Let's prepare for Ramadan in Rajab, one of the four sacred months in Islam. What to do in Rajab Tips to prepare for Ramadan fasting, Rejab, Rajab “I want to do better this year and reap all the rewards that I can!” are some of the thoughts we often try to achieve as we look into the remaining days before Ramadan. The challenge is to stay motivated and retain consistency. Some of us tend to feel unmotivated as early as the first week of Ramadan. Have you ever gone through that cycle every year and wondered why is it difficult to stay motivated along the way, just to find yourself regretting it in the end? It is nevertheless a good move to want to do something great during Ramadan. However, like any other battle, we have to plan and strategise to enter it fully prepared. There is a saying that goes; “If you fail to plan, you plan to fail” and Rajab is one of the best times to start preparing for Ramadan. Rajab is one of the four sacred months, other than Zulkaedah, Zulhijjah and Muharram. Allah s.w.t. mentions in Surah At-Tawbah: إِنَّ عِدَّةَ الشُّهورِ عِندَ اللَّهِ اثنا عَشَرَ شَهرًا في كِتابِ اللَّهِ يَومَ خَلَقَ السَّماواتِ وَالأَرضَ مِنها أَربَعَةٌ حُرُمٌ “Indeed, the number of months ordained by Allah is twelve—in Allah’s record since the day He created the heavens and the earth—of which four are sacred.” (Surah At-Tawbah, 9:36) Read: 4 Sacred Months in Islam The classical Muslim scholar Ibn Rajab al-Hanbali quoted another scholar, Abu Bakr Al-Warraq, in his book Lataif al-Ma’arif: “Rajab is a month of cultivation, Syaaban is the month of irrigating the fields, and Ramadan is the month of reaping and harvesting.” This means that with the proper preparation and effort particularly in the month of Rajab, achieving the best Ramadan experience yet can be a possibility by Allah's Will. Read: Rajab: The Forgotten Sacred Month Thus, in order to achieve the goals you set, preparation has to start now. So here are 8 simple steps that you can follow to prepare for Ramadan: 1. Prepare A Checklist Prepare a checklist for Ramadan, Rejab, Rajab Yes, you read it correctly. You have to write down your goals instead of relying solely on a mental checklist. Pen down your checklist of what you would like to achieve in Ramadan. By doing so, you are subconsciously recording it in your mind as well. Then, hang the checklist where you can see it each and every day. This is to remind you of your goals constantly. 2. Set Realistic Goals Set realistic goals for ramadan, Rejab, Rajab Set the goals you would like to achieve, but make sure that they are practical. It’s okay to set a goal as simple as donating or reading a page of the Quran every day. Instead of focusing on the number of pages, why not focus on the consistency of the 'Ibadah (worship)? The ultimate goal is to ensure the goals we set do not end here but continue beyond until we meet the next Ramadan, insyaAllah (God willing). There is a reason Islam encourages us to practise moderation in every aspect of our lives so that it will be easier for us to sustain and practise istiqomah (consistency). The Prophet s.a.w said: أَحَبُّ الأَعْمَالِ إِلَى اللَّهِ تَعَالَى أَدْوَمُهَا وَإِنْ قَلَّ “The most beloved deeds to Allah s.w.t are those which are done consistently, even if they are little,” (Sahih Al-Bukhari) 3. Do Revision To Internalise The Meaning Of Ramadan Revise and read up on Ramadan and its meaning, Rejab, Rajab Start by reading about the virtues of Ramadan to internalise the meaning of fasting. For example, you could read about the multiple grades of fasting in Inner Dimensions of Islamic Worship, a book that consists of selections from Imam Ghazali's Ihya' 'Ulum al-Din (The Revival of Islamic Sciences). Read: Frequently Asked Questions During Ramadan Besides that, revise the supplications and other types of remembrance that we can recite during Ramadan. It will be helpful to know when and how to do these acts of worship. Finally, on Lailatul Qadar (Night of Power), it is encouraged to read the different types of Sunnah prayers during Qiyamulail (night vigil prayers) and reap the great rewards. Read: How To Pray Tahajjud and Perform Qiyamullail 4. Get The Engine Running Do sunnah fasting to prepare for ramadan, Rejab, Rajab We can start with fasting voluntarily, either Monday and Thursday, or on Ayyamul Bidh (the white days of fasting), being the 13th, 14th and 15th day of every month, or any three days of the month. تُعْرَضُ الأَعْمَالُ يَوْمَ الاِثْنَيْنِ وَالْخَمِيسِ فَأُحِبُّ أَنْ يُعْرَضَ عَمَلِي وَأَنَا صَائِمٌ "Deeds are presented (before Allah) on Mondays and Thursdays, so I love that my actions be presented while I am fasting" (Sunan At-Tirmizi) The Prophet s.a.w was also reported in another hadith: وعنْ مُعاذةَ العَدَوِيَّةِ أَنَّها سَأَلَتْ عائشةَ رضيَ اللَّه عَنْهَا: أَكانَ رَسُولُ اللَّهِ ﷺ يصومُ مِن كُلِّ شَهرٍ ثلاثةَ أَيَّامٍ؟ قَالَت: نَعَمْ. فَقُلْتُ: منْ أَيِّ الشَّهْر كَانَ يَصُومُ؟ قَالَتْ: لَمْ يَكُن يُبَالي مِنْ أَيِّ الشَّهْرِ يَصُومُ. I heard Muaz say; "I asked Aisyah r.a; Did the Prophet s.a.w. fast three days each month?" She replied: "Yes," I asked: "Which days did he fast?" She replied: "He did not care on which day he fasted" (Sahih Muslim) Also, we can choose an action that we want to do consistently, such as reading verses of the Quran, waking up at night even if we managed to pray just 2 rakaat of tahajjud (night vigil prayer) just before Subuh or giving charity every Friday. Hopefully, this will become a habit, not only during Ramadan but after that as well. 5. Prepare for Syawal Prepare for Hari Raya before fasting in Ramadan, Rejab, Rajab Do the major shopping or spring cleaning before we enter Ramadan so that we can give our 100 per cent of focus in Ramadan for acts of worship. It is troublesome to divide our time for Hari Raya preparation while trying to achieve the goals we have set in Ramadan. So why not do them now? 6. Plan Your Meals And Work Out Plan your meals for Ramadan, rejab, rajab Undoubtedly, for us to be able to do these acts of worship, we need a healthy body. As the saying goes, a healthy body leads to a healthy mind. Plan your meals so that you will eat moderately and waste less. Plan your workout activities. Fasting should not be the reason to skip our exercise. Do workouts that focus on strength rather than cardio. 7. Prepare For Your Menstruation Days Find out what is allowed during menstruation in islam, Rejab, Rajab Ladies, don’t despair. These days are there not for us to feel sad nor to stop all our deeds. Instead, we can increase worship. There are only a few prohibitions during this time such as fasting, praying and holding the Quran. Aside from that, we can still do zikr (words of remembrance), give charity and help to prepare sahur (breakfast) and iftar (breaking the fast). Read: 7 Things You Can Do If You Cannot Fast During Ramadan 8. Make Constant Dua Make constant Dua to reach Ramadan, Rejab, Rajab It was narrated in Lataif al-Ma’arif by Ibn Rajab Al-Hanbali that the companions will supplicate for 6 months to allow them to reach Ramadan safely. They will then pray for another 6 months after Ramadan that may Allah accept from them their acts of worship observed in the month of Ramadan. We can recite the following doa: اللَّهُمَّ بَارِكْ لَنَا فِي رَجَب، وَشَعْبَانَ، وَبَلِّغْنَا رَمَضَانَ Allahumma barik lana fi Rajab wa Sha’ban wa ballighna Ramadan “O Allah make the months of Rajab and Sha’ban blessed for us and let us reach the month of Ramadan.” (Musnad Ahmad) And the Dua: اللَّهُمَّ سَلِّمْنِي مِنْ رَمَضَانَ، وَسَلِّمْ رَمَضَانَ لِي، وَتَسَلَّمْهُ مِنِّي مُتَقَبَّلًا Allahumma Sallimni min Ramadhan. Wa sallim Ramadhana li. Wa tasallamhu minni mutaqabbala “O Allah preserve me for Ramadan, safeguard Ramadan for me and accept it for me.” (narrated by Imam At-Tabrani) After all, it is His blessings in Ramadan that we yearn for. So in preparing to reap the rewards, let’s turn to Him and ask from the Most Giving. May Allah eases our preparation to meet the holy month this year and May Allah s.w.t accept all our deeds. https://muslim.sg/articles/how-to-prepare-for-ramadan https://donshafi911.blogspot.com/2024/02/8-tips-to-prepare-for-ramadan-in-rajab.html
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  • The Lion Diet Reset for Jumpstarting Your Healing Journey
    Just red meat, salt and mineral water to wash it down.

    Dr. Syed Haider
    What do Lions Eat? - Discovery UK
    I gained about 40 - 50 pounds during the pandemic primarily due to stress, poor sleep and too much sugar, then I lost it all by eating whole foods, sleeping well and walking 10,000-15,000 steps a day, then I gained some of it back by eating sugar again and slacking on sleep hygiene, though I mostly kept up the walking, which had become a morning habit (I was actually pleasantly surprised to see that for over 18 months now I’ve always averaged close to 10,000 steps a day over any 6 month period (the health app in my phone)).

    Meanwhile a friend of mine who had benefited greatly from the carnivore diet in the past, but fell off the wagon and had been trying to get back on for awhile had been encouraging me for some time to be his accountability partner on a diet change journey so finally I decided to take the plunge.

    From personal experience I know very well that the hardest hill to climb is that initial decision to make a change for the better. After you’ve truly made a commitment to change, sustaining it is not nearly as hard.

    You also find many complementary healthy changes suddenly become easier to implement. It feels like there is a “good boy” template in the subconscious and an opposing “bad boy” one, though that term carries other perhaps conflicting (perhaps not) connotations.

    What I mean is that all the things I’ve collected throughout my life that I consider good healthy behaviors tend to creep back sooner or later once I decided to get healthier and take the first steps towards better health.

    Similarly if I cheat unexpectedly, that single “bad” choice has usually led to most of the good I was doing falling apart and me going back to all the old bad ways.

    In order to circumvent this tendency I’m planning to build in some flexibility in the form of “cheat” days, but I don’t think it’s helpful to think of them as cheat days, in fact I think it only serves to make it likely that your subconscious considers them a “bad” thing.

    The key to success and sustainability is to consider them a good thing instead, think of them more as health/metabolic/recovery hormetic stress tests, that are preplanned and executed as a key part of a healthy lifestyle protocol (hormesis: low dose stressor is beneficial, high dose is harmful. Applies to exercise, sunlight, water, food, homeopathy, pharmacology, herbology, even many so called chemical toxins - the dose makes the poison and all).

    The goal is not only to regain good health but to regain maximal resilience and ability to sustain that good health in the face of challenging situations where you can’t sleep properly, or eat properly or exercise the way you usually do, or you’re exposed to toxic blue light for prolonged periods, or someone close to you passes away, or you lose a job, etc.

    Thank you for reading Dr. Syed Haider. This post is public so feel free to share it.

    Share

    I’m one of those people who can eat a dozen cupcakes if I’m feeling stressed out, but if I stop eating sugar entirely I don’t have any cravings for it. Moderation is impossible, but abstinence is easy. So maybe I’m addicted, or maybe I’m just populated by microbes that depend on sugar.

    I did a 5 day carnivore reset before my initial weight loss journey started perhaps 18 months ago now, and I was amazed to see that I had no sugar cravings for a couple of months afterwards. Literally for the first time in my life sugar bombs survived in my house for over 48 hours. We had a tub of ice cream that was not finished for a month, which would have been as likely as a pig flying before that.

    But after that period of a couple months I gradually lost my indifference to sweets and then eventually went back to full on sweet-tooth, cookie-monster mode, which was a big part of my eventual downfall later.

    My weight loss also stalled out before I got really lean, I felt way better, looked away better, at least in clothes, but I was probably still carrying an extra 30 pounds of fat internally - the visceral fat - which, though invisible to the naked eye, is the worst kind for your health.

    Carnivore seems to most people to be like an extreme overreaction to the vegan movement, and perhaps it is culturally an immune reaction of sorts, but it pays to consider what the proponents of the diet say.

    One of the most telling arguments in favor is that plants are trying to kill you.

    Losing my finger to a 'meat eating' plant? - YouTube
    Plants like all living things, would prefer to stay alive, and are in a life or death struggle with those who would kill them.

    Since they can’t run away or fight off their predators, they primarily rely on poisoning them, and animals have developed finely tuned senses that let them know if there is a poison present - it tastes bad, usually very bitter, and the usual reaction is to spit it out (and wash your mouth out), the way a baby will when you try to feed them broccoli or Brussel sprouts.

    Most non-human mammals that are herbivores or omnivores are only evolutionarily optimized to digest a small selection of plants in their environment.

    Human civilizations first of all domesticated and bred plants to make them more palatable, and then developed intricate methods of neutralizing and predigesting plants via soaking, sprouting, culturing and cooking plant foods to make them less toxic, though we can’t entirely eliminate all toxins even with these complicated traditional procedures (hormesis argues the remaining toxins are probably beneficial stressors, and there are other beneficial phytonutrients too).

    Modern manufacturing eschews all that traditional wisdom for quick production methods that leave the lectins, oxalates, phtyates, tannins, hormone disruptors, and nutrient blockers intact.

    But even if someone took appropriate care to use traditional methods of food preparation, and also made sure to use seasonal ingredients, and combined them in the traditional recipes that made use of various complementary ingredients, they would still be left with some degree of plant poisons in their diet.

    I was shocked to learn that every plant in the grocery store has dozens of known carcinogens, and plants produce phytotoxins that total 10,000 times the amount of pesticides sprayed on them (the primary concern with meat is improper handling leading to microorganisms polluting it, and improper cooking methods leading to char - i.e. you don’t want to burn it).

    As far as we know all human societies in every age throughout history ate as much meat as they could get their hands on, and supplemented with plants only when necessary to avert calorie restriction, treat/prevent illness, and as a garnish, or side dish to their meat. The farther back we go the less palatable the plants were and they required even more processing to make them edible.

    Agrarian societies were always, and still are, less healthy than their hunter gatherer counterparts.

    Now, to be clear, I’m not arguing for a forever meat diet.

    The Lion diet refers to eating just ruminant red meat garnished with salt and washed down with mineral rich water.

    The way I see it, this is an elimination diet, of which there are many.

    Some popular ones include AIP, Carnivore and Vegan.

    AIP is the autoimmune paleo diet and advises removing grains, sugars, eggs, dairy, soy, and nightshade vegetables.

    Carnivore allows all meat, fish, dairy and eggs.

    Vegan allows only plant products.

    The idea behind elimination diets, which were a mainstay of pre-modern medical systems, and still used heavily in functional and alternative medicine today, is that something you are eating is preventing your body from recovering from chronic illness, perhaps due to a “leaky gut”, i.e. your gut lining has become damaged and permeable by some toxic insult (like viral/vax entry into the bloodstream and subsequent transfection of key cells) to partially digested food particles which trigger immune reactions that can cross react with your own tissues or simply create inflammation that keeps you sick, and keeps the gut lining from healing.

    Eliminate the foods and eliminate your symptoms, heal the gut, then reintroduce the foods one at a time, carefully watching for reactions.

    It can get complicated because the reactions can take weeks to wear off, and days to recur upon reexposure. So the reintroduction phase is usually done by consuming the test food for 3 days then waiting another 4 days for a reaction.

    Tracking gut permeability tests (lactulose-mannitol ratio, zonulin level, antibodies to zonulin, actin, and lipopolysaccharide) can help determine when to begin the reintroduction phase.

    Given the inherent toxicity of plants, which has developed as an evolutionary defense mechanism against being eaten, and the relatively benign nature of animal meat the safest elimination diets either limit the most toxic plant foods, or eliminate plant foods altogether.

    Share

    In my case I know I have an autoimmune issue with mild psoriasis, which is likely related to leaky gut, I also have had chronic constipation, occasional reflux, occasional headaches, occasional stuffy nose, a tendency towards insomnia, and relatively rapid aging in the last few years with significant weight gain.

    So my plan is to try to reverse all of these naturally and I’ll likely be checking micronutrient levels and genetics at some point to fine tune things using protocols developed by Chris Masterjohn.

    Diet over the longer term will likely trend towards lower in carbs, higher in meat/seafood, dairy, and eggs, but this will depend on my carb tolerance in the future as evidenced by markers like body fat and fasting insulin levels. Will eat shortly after waking to help strengthen the circadian rhythm further.

    Exercise will start with mobility drills, walks, sprints (because no other exercise naturally stimulates muscle gain and fat loss better - just look at an olympic sprinter - the message to your body is either: something’s about to kill us, or we’re about to starve and need to catch some food fast, so shape up ASAP and help me out here), body weight exercises, maybe kettlebell swings.

    Skin and hair care will include traditional topical treatments like egg whites, egg yolks, tallow, and essential oils.

    Sleep will be as much as needed and regular hours.

    Light environment: aim to minimize blue light toxicity from sunlight filtered through window glass, and indoor bulbs by spending as much time outdoors as possible. Sun exposure in the mornings and around sunset especially with some midday sun.

    Also need to work on emotional and spiritual growth and interpersonal relationships, but those are higher hanging fruit.

    Anyway let me know if you’ve tried an elimination diet in the past and how it went for you.

    https://blog.mygotodoc.com/p/the-lion-diet-reset-for-jumpstarting
    The Lion Diet Reset for Jumpstarting Your Healing Journey Just red meat, salt and mineral water to wash it down. Dr. Syed Haider What do Lions Eat? - Discovery UK I gained about 40 - 50 pounds during the pandemic primarily due to stress, poor sleep and too much sugar, then I lost it all by eating whole foods, sleeping well and walking 10,000-15,000 steps a day, then I gained some of it back by eating sugar again and slacking on sleep hygiene, though I mostly kept up the walking, which had become a morning habit (I was actually pleasantly surprised to see that for over 18 months now I’ve always averaged close to 10,000 steps a day over any 6 month period (the health app in my phone)). Meanwhile a friend of mine who had benefited greatly from the carnivore diet in the past, but fell off the wagon and had been trying to get back on for awhile had been encouraging me for some time to be his accountability partner on a diet change journey so finally I decided to take the plunge. From personal experience I know very well that the hardest hill to climb is that initial decision to make a change for the better. After you’ve truly made a commitment to change, sustaining it is not nearly as hard. You also find many complementary healthy changes suddenly become easier to implement. It feels like there is a “good boy” template in the subconscious and an opposing “bad boy” one, though that term carries other perhaps conflicting (perhaps not) connotations. What I mean is that all the things I’ve collected throughout my life that I consider good healthy behaviors tend to creep back sooner or later once I decided to get healthier and take the first steps towards better health. Similarly if I cheat unexpectedly, that single “bad” choice has usually led to most of the good I was doing falling apart and me going back to all the old bad ways. In order to circumvent this tendency I’m planning to build in some flexibility in the form of “cheat” days, but I don’t think it’s helpful to think of them as cheat days, in fact I think it only serves to make it likely that your subconscious considers them a “bad” thing. The key to success and sustainability is to consider them a good thing instead, think of them more as health/metabolic/recovery hormetic stress tests, that are preplanned and executed as a key part of a healthy lifestyle protocol (hormesis: low dose stressor is beneficial, high dose is harmful. Applies to exercise, sunlight, water, food, homeopathy, pharmacology, herbology, even many so called chemical toxins - the dose makes the poison and all). The goal is not only to regain good health but to regain maximal resilience and ability to sustain that good health in the face of challenging situations where you can’t sleep properly, or eat properly or exercise the way you usually do, or you’re exposed to toxic blue light for prolonged periods, or someone close to you passes away, or you lose a job, etc. Thank you for reading Dr. Syed Haider. This post is public so feel free to share it. Share I’m one of those people who can eat a dozen cupcakes if I’m feeling stressed out, but if I stop eating sugar entirely I don’t have any cravings for it. Moderation is impossible, but abstinence is easy. So maybe I’m addicted, or maybe I’m just populated by microbes that depend on sugar. I did a 5 day carnivore reset before my initial weight loss journey started perhaps 18 months ago now, and I was amazed to see that I had no sugar cravings for a couple of months afterwards. Literally for the first time in my life sugar bombs survived in my house for over 48 hours. We had a tub of ice cream that was not finished for a month, which would have been as likely as a pig flying before that. But after that period of a couple months I gradually lost my indifference to sweets and then eventually went back to full on sweet-tooth, cookie-monster mode, which was a big part of my eventual downfall later. My weight loss also stalled out before I got really lean, I felt way better, looked away better, at least in clothes, but I was probably still carrying an extra 30 pounds of fat internally - the visceral fat - which, though invisible to the naked eye, is the worst kind for your health. Carnivore seems to most people to be like an extreme overreaction to the vegan movement, and perhaps it is culturally an immune reaction of sorts, but it pays to consider what the proponents of the diet say. One of the most telling arguments in favor is that plants are trying to kill you. Losing my finger to a 'meat eating' plant? - YouTube Plants like all living things, would prefer to stay alive, and are in a life or death struggle with those who would kill them. Since they can’t run away or fight off their predators, they primarily rely on poisoning them, and animals have developed finely tuned senses that let them know if there is a poison present - it tastes bad, usually very bitter, and the usual reaction is to spit it out (and wash your mouth out), the way a baby will when you try to feed them broccoli or Brussel sprouts. Most non-human mammals that are herbivores or omnivores are only evolutionarily optimized to digest a small selection of plants in their environment. Human civilizations first of all domesticated and bred plants to make them more palatable, and then developed intricate methods of neutralizing and predigesting plants via soaking, sprouting, culturing and cooking plant foods to make them less toxic, though we can’t entirely eliminate all toxins even with these complicated traditional procedures (hormesis argues the remaining toxins are probably beneficial stressors, and there are other beneficial phytonutrients too). Modern manufacturing eschews all that traditional wisdom for quick production methods that leave the lectins, oxalates, phtyates, tannins, hormone disruptors, and nutrient blockers intact. But even if someone took appropriate care to use traditional methods of food preparation, and also made sure to use seasonal ingredients, and combined them in the traditional recipes that made use of various complementary ingredients, they would still be left with some degree of plant poisons in their diet. I was shocked to learn that every plant in the grocery store has dozens of known carcinogens, and plants produce phytotoxins that total 10,000 times the amount of pesticides sprayed on them (the primary concern with meat is improper handling leading to microorganisms polluting it, and improper cooking methods leading to char - i.e. you don’t want to burn it). As far as we know all human societies in every age throughout history ate as much meat as they could get their hands on, and supplemented with plants only when necessary to avert calorie restriction, treat/prevent illness, and as a garnish, or side dish to their meat. The farther back we go the less palatable the plants were and they required even more processing to make them edible. Agrarian societies were always, and still are, less healthy than their hunter gatherer counterparts. Now, to be clear, I’m not arguing for a forever meat diet. The Lion diet refers to eating just ruminant red meat garnished with salt and washed down with mineral rich water. The way I see it, this is an elimination diet, of which there are many. Some popular ones include AIP, Carnivore and Vegan. AIP is the autoimmune paleo diet and advises removing grains, sugars, eggs, dairy, soy, and nightshade vegetables. Carnivore allows all meat, fish, dairy and eggs. Vegan allows only plant products. The idea behind elimination diets, which were a mainstay of pre-modern medical systems, and still used heavily in functional and alternative medicine today, is that something you are eating is preventing your body from recovering from chronic illness, perhaps due to a “leaky gut”, i.e. your gut lining has become damaged and permeable by some toxic insult (like viral/vax entry into the bloodstream and subsequent transfection of key cells) to partially digested food particles which trigger immune reactions that can cross react with your own tissues or simply create inflammation that keeps you sick, and keeps the gut lining from healing. Eliminate the foods and eliminate your symptoms, heal the gut, then reintroduce the foods one at a time, carefully watching for reactions. It can get complicated because the reactions can take weeks to wear off, and days to recur upon reexposure. So the reintroduction phase is usually done by consuming the test food for 3 days then waiting another 4 days for a reaction. Tracking gut permeability tests (lactulose-mannitol ratio, zonulin level, antibodies to zonulin, actin, and lipopolysaccharide) can help determine when to begin the reintroduction phase. Given the inherent toxicity of plants, which has developed as an evolutionary defense mechanism against being eaten, and the relatively benign nature of animal meat the safest elimination diets either limit the most toxic plant foods, or eliminate plant foods altogether. Share In my case I know I have an autoimmune issue with mild psoriasis, which is likely related to leaky gut, I also have had chronic constipation, occasional reflux, occasional headaches, occasional stuffy nose, a tendency towards insomnia, and relatively rapid aging in the last few years with significant weight gain. So my plan is to try to reverse all of these naturally and I’ll likely be checking micronutrient levels and genetics at some point to fine tune things using protocols developed by Chris Masterjohn. Diet over the longer term will likely trend towards lower in carbs, higher in meat/seafood, dairy, and eggs, but this will depend on my carb tolerance in the future as evidenced by markers like body fat and fasting insulin levels. Will eat shortly after waking to help strengthen the circadian rhythm further. Exercise will start with mobility drills, walks, sprints (because no other exercise naturally stimulates muscle gain and fat loss better - just look at an olympic sprinter - the message to your body is either: something’s about to kill us, or we’re about to starve and need to catch some food fast, so shape up ASAP and help me out here), body weight exercises, maybe kettlebell swings. Skin and hair care will include traditional topical treatments like egg whites, egg yolks, tallow, and essential oils. Sleep will be as much as needed and regular hours. Light environment: aim to minimize blue light toxicity from sunlight filtered through window glass, and indoor bulbs by spending as much time outdoors as possible. Sun exposure in the mornings and around sunset especially with some midday sun. Also need to work on emotional and spiritual growth and interpersonal relationships, but those are higher hanging fruit. Anyway let me know if you’ve tried an elimination diet in the past and how it went for you. https://blog.mygotodoc.com/p/the-lion-diet-reset-for-jumpstarting
    BLOG.MYGOTODOC.COM
    The Lion Diet Reset for Jumpstarting Your Healing Journey
    Just red meat, salt and mineral water to wash it down.
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  • 8 Tips To Prepare For Ramadan in Rajab
    Let's prepare for Ramadan in Rajab, one of the four sacred months in Islam.
    What to do in Rajab
    Tips to prepare for Ramadan fasting, Rejab, Rajab
    “I want to do better this year and reap all the rewards that I can!” are some of the thoughts we often try to achieve as we look into the remaining days before Ramadan. The challenge is to stay motivated and retain consistency. Some of us tend to feel unmotivated as early as the first week of Ramadan.
    Have you ever gone through that cycle every year and wondered why is it difficult to stay motivated along the way, just to find yourself regretting it in the end?
    It is nevertheless a good move to want to do something great during Ramadan. However, like any other battle, we have to plan and strategise to enter it fully prepared. There is a saying that goes; “If you fail to plan, you plan to fail” and Rajab is one of the best times to start preparing for Ramadan.
    Rajab is one of the four sacred months, other than Zulkaedah, Zulhijjah and Muharram. Allah s.w.t. mentions in Surah At-Tawbah:
    إِنَّ عِدَّةَ الشُّهورِ عِندَ اللَّهِ اثنا عَشَرَ شَهرًا في كِتابِ اللَّهِ يَومَ خَلَقَ السَّماواتِ وَالأَرضَ مِنها أَربَعَةٌ حُرُمٌ
    “Indeed, the number of months ordained by Allah is twelve—in Allah’s record since the day He created the heavens and the earth—of which four are sacred.”
    (Surah At-Tawbah, 9:36)
    Read: 4 Sacred Months in Islam
    The classical Muslim scholar Ibn Rajab al-Hanbali quoted another scholar, Abu Bakr Al-Warraq, in his book Lataif al-Ma’arif:
    “Rajab is a month of cultivation, Syaaban is the month of irrigating the fields, and Ramadan is the month of reaping and harvesting.”
    This means that with the proper preparation and effort particularly in the month of Rajab, achieving the best Ramadan experience yet can be a possibility by Allah's Will.
    Read: Rajab: The Forgotten Sacred Month
    Thus, in order to achieve the goals you set, preparation has to start now. So here are 8 simple steps that you can follow to prepare for Ramadan:
    1. Prepare A Checklist
    Prepare a checklist for Ramadan, Rejab, Rajab Yes, you read it correctly. You have to write down your goals instead of relying solely on a mental checklist. Pen down your checklist of what you would like to achieve in Ramadan.
    By doing so, you are subconsciously recording it in your mind as well. Then, hang the checklist where you can see it each and every day.
    This is to remind you of your goals constantly.
    2. Set Realistic Goals
    Set realistic goals for ramadan, Rejab, Rajab Set the goals you would like to achieve, but make sure that they are practical. It’s okay to set a goal as simple as donating or reading a page of the Quran every day. Instead of focusing on the number of pages, why not focus on the consistency of the 'Ibadah (worship)?
    The ultimate goal is to ensure the goals we set do not end here but continue beyond until we meet the next Ramadan, insyaAllah (God willing). There is a reason Islam encourages us to practise moderation in every aspect of our lives so that it will be easier for us to sustain and practise istiqomah (consistency). The Prophet s.a.w said:
    أَحَبُّ الأَعْمَالِ إِلَى اللَّهِ تَعَالَى أَدْوَمُهَا وَإِنْ قَلَّ
    “The most beloved deeds to Allah s.w.t are those which are done consistently, even if they are little,”
    (Sahih Al-Bukhari)
    3. Do Revision To Internalise The Meaning Of Ramadan
    Revise and read up on Ramadan and its meaning, Rejab, Rajab Start by reading about the virtues of Ramadan to internalise the meaning of fasting. For example, you could read about the multiple grades of fasting in Inner Dimensions of Islamic Worship, a book that consists of selections from Imam Ghazali's Ihya' 'Ulum al-Din (The Revival of Islamic Sciences).
    Read: Frequently Asked Questions During Ramadan
    Besides that, revise the supplications and other types of remembrance that we can recite during Ramadan. It will be helpful to know when and how to do these acts of worship. Finally, on Lailatul Qadar (Night of Power), it is encouraged to read the different types of Sunnah prayers during Qiyamulail (night vigil prayers) and reap the great rewards.
    Read: How To Pray Tahajjud and Perform Qiyamullail
    4. Get The Engine Running
    Do sunnah fasting to prepare for ramadan, Rejab, Rajab
    We can start with fasting voluntarily, either Monday and Thursday, or on Ayyamul Bidh (the white days of fasting), being the 13th, 14th and 15th day of every month, or any three days of the month.
    تُعْرَضُ الأَعْمَالُ يَوْمَ الاِثْنَيْنِ وَالْخَمِيسِ فَأُحِبُّ أَنْ يُعْرَضَ عَمَلِي وَأَنَا صَائِمٌ
    "Deeds are presented (before Allah) on Mondays and Thursdays, so I love that my actions be presented while I am fasting"
    (Sunan At-Tirmizi)
    The Prophet s.a.w was also reported in another hadith:
    وعنْ مُعاذةَ العَدَوِيَّةِ أَنَّها سَأَلَتْ عائشةَ رضيَ اللَّه عَنْهَا: أَكانَ رَسُولُ اللَّهِ ﷺ يصومُ مِن كُلِّ شَهرٍ ثلاثةَ أَيَّامٍ؟ قَالَت: نَعَمْ. فَقُلْتُ: منْ أَيِّ الشَّهْر كَانَ يَصُومُ؟ قَالَتْ: لَمْ يَكُن يُبَالي مِنْ أَيِّ الشَّهْرِ يَصُومُ.
    I heard Muaz say; "I asked Aisyah r.a; Did the Prophet s.a.w. fast three days each month?" She replied: "Yes," I asked: "Which days did he fast?" She replied: "He did not care on which day he fasted"
    (Sahih Muslim)
    Also, we can choose an action that we want to do consistently, such as reading verses of the Quran, waking up at night even if we managed to pray just 2 rakaat of tahajjud (night vigil prayer) just before Subuh or giving charity every Friday. Hopefully, this will become a habit, not only during Ramadan but after that as well.
    5. Prepare for Syawal
    Prepare for Hari Raya before fasting in Ramadan, Rejab, Rajab Do the major shopping or spring cleaning before we enter Ramadan so that we can give our 100 per cent of focus in Ramadan for acts of worship. It is troublesome to divide our time for Hari Raya preparation while trying to achieve the goals we have set in Ramadan.
    So why not do them now?
    6. Plan Your Meals And Work Out
    Plan your meals for Ramadan, rejab, rajab Undoubtedly, for us to be able to do these acts of worship, we need a healthy body. As the saying goes, a healthy body leads to a healthy mind. Plan your meals so that you will eat moderately and waste less. Plan your workout activities. Fasting should not be the reason to skip our exercise. Do workouts that focus on strength rather than cardio.
    7. Prepare For Your Menstruation Days
    Find out what is allowed during menstruation in islam, Rejab, Rajab Ladies, don’t despair. These days are there not for us to feel sad nor to stop all our deeds. Instead, we can increase worship. There are only a few prohibitions during this time such as fasting, praying and holding the Quran. Aside from that, we can still do zikr (words of remembrance), give charity and help to prepare sahur (breakfast) and iftar (breaking the fast).
    Read: 7 Things You Can Do If You Cannot Fast During Ramadan
    8. Make Constant Dua
    Make constant Dua to reach Ramadan, Rejab, Rajab It was narrated in Lataif al-Ma’arif by Ibn Rajab Al-Hanbali that the companions will supplicate for 6 months to allow them to reach Ramadan safely. They will then pray for another 6 months after Ramadan that may Allah accept from them their acts of worship observed in the month of Ramadan. We can recite the following doa:
    اللَّهُمَّ بَارِكْ لَنَا فِي رَجَب، وَشَعْبَانَ، وَبَلِّغْنَا رَمَضَانَ
    Allahumma barik lana fi Rajab wa Sha’ban wa ballighna Ramadan
    “O Allah make the months of Rajab and Sha’ban blessed for us and let us reach the month of Ramadan.”
    (Musnad Ahmad)
    And the Dua:
    اللَّهُمَّ سَلِّمْنِي مِنْ رَمَضَانَ، وَسَلِّمْ رَمَضَانَ لِي، وَتَسَلَّمْهُ مِنِّي مُتَقَبَّلًا
    Allahumma Sallimni min Ramadhan. Wa sallim Ramadhana li. Wa tasallamhu minni mutaqabbala
    “O Allah preserve me for Ramadan, safeguard Ramadan for me and accept it for me.”
    (narrated by Imam At-Tabrani)
    After all, it is His blessings in Ramadan that we yearn for. So in preparing to reap the rewards, let’s turn to Him and ask from the Most Giving. May Allah eases our preparation to meet the holy month this year and May Allah s.w.t accept all our deeds.
    https://muslim.sg/articles/how-to-prepare-for-ramadan

    https://donshafi911.blogspot.com/2024/02/8-tips-to-prepare-for-ramadan-in-rajab.html
    8 Tips To Prepare For Ramadan in Rajab Let's prepare for Ramadan in Rajab, one of the four sacred months in Islam. What to do in Rajab Tips to prepare for Ramadan fasting, Rejab, Rajab “I want to do better this year and reap all the rewards that I can!” are some of the thoughts we often try to achieve as we look into the remaining days before Ramadan. The challenge is to stay motivated and retain consistency. Some of us tend to feel unmotivated as early as the first week of Ramadan. Have you ever gone through that cycle every year and wondered why is it difficult to stay motivated along the way, just to find yourself regretting it in the end? It is nevertheless a good move to want to do something great during Ramadan. However, like any other battle, we have to plan and strategise to enter it fully prepared. There is a saying that goes; “If you fail to plan, you plan to fail” and Rajab is one of the best times to start preparing for Ramadan. Rajab is one of the four sacred months, other than Zulkaedah, Zulhijjah and Muharram. Allah s.w.t. mentions in Surah At-Tawbah: إِنَّ عِدَّةَ الشُّهورِ عِندَ اللَّهِ اثنا عَشَرَ شَهرًا في كِتابِ اللَّهِ يَومَ خَلَقَ السَّماواتِ وَالأَرضَ مِنها أَربَعَةٌ حُرُمٌ “Indeed, the number of months ordained by Allah is twelve—in Allah’s record since the day He created the heavens and the earth—of which four are sacred.” (Surah At-Tawbah, 9:36) Read: 4 Sacred Months in Islam The classical Muslim scholar Ibn Rajab al-Hanbali quoted another scholar, Abu Bakr Al-Warraq, in his book Lataif al-Ma’arif: “Rajab is a month of cultivation, Syaaban is the month of irrigating the fields, and Ramadan is the month of reaping and harvesting.” This means that with the proper preparation and effort particularly in the month of Rajab, achieving the best Ramadan experience yet can be a possibility by Allah's Will. Read: Rajab: The Forgotten Sacred Month Thus, in order to achieve the goals you set, preparation has to start now. So here are 8 simple steps that you can follow to prepare for Ramadan: 1. Prepare A Checklist Prepare a checklist for Ramadan, Rejab, Rajab Yes, you read it correctly. You have to write down your goals instead of relying solely on a mental checklist. Pen down your checklist of what you would like to achieve in Ramadan. By doing so, you are subconsciously recording it in your mind as well. Then, hang the checklist where you can see it each and every day. This is to remind you of your goals constantly. 2. Set Realistic Goals Set realistic goals for ramadan, Rejab, Rajab Set the goals you would like to achieve, but make sure that they are practical. It’s okay to set a goal as simple as donating or reading a page of the Quran every day. Instead of focusing on the number of pages, why not focus on the consistency of the 'Ibadah (worship)? The ultimate goal is to ensure the goals we set do not end here but continue beyond until we meet the next Ramadan, insyaAllah (God willing). There is a reason Islam encourages us to practise moderation in every aspect of our lives so that it will be easier for us to sustain and practise istiqomah (consistency). The Prophet s.a.w said: أَحَبُّ الأَعْمَالِ إِلَى اللَّهِ تَعَالَى أَدْوَمُهَا وَإِنْ قَلَّ “The most beloved deeds to Allah s.w.t are those which are done consistently, even if they are little,” (Sahih Al-Bukhari) 3. Do Revision To Internalise The Meaning Of Ramadan Revise and read up on Ramadan and its meaning, Rejab, Rajab Start by reading about the virtues of Ramadan to internalise the meaning of fasting. For example, you could read about the multiple grades of fasting in Inner Dimensions of Islamic Worship, a book that consists of selections from Imam Ghazali's Ihya' 'Ulum al-Din (The Revival of Islamic Sciences). Read: Frequently Asked Questions During Ramadan Besides that, revise the supplications and other types of remembrance that we can recite during Ramadan. It will be helpful to know when and how to do these acts of worship. Finally, on Lailatul Qadar (Night of Power), it is encouraged to read the different types of Sunnah prayers during Qiyamulail (night vigil prayers) and reap the great rewards. Read: How To Pray Tahajjud and Perform Qiyamullail 4. Get The Engine Running Do sunnah fasting to prepare for ramadan, Rejab, Rajab We can start with fasting voluntarily, either Monday and Thursday, or on Ayyamul Bidh (the white days of fasting), being the 13th, 14th and 15th day of every month, or any three days of the month. تُعْرَضُ الأَعْمَالُ يَوْمَ الاِثْنَيْنِ وَالْخَمِيسِ فَأُحِبُّ أَنْ يُعْرَضَ عَمَلِي وَأَنَا صَائِمٌ "Deeds are presented (before Allah) on Mondays and Thursdays, so I love that my actions be presented while I am fasting" (Sunan At-Tirmizi) The Prophet s.a.w was also reported in another hadith: وعنْ مُعاذةَ العَدَوِيَّةِ أَنَّها سَأَلَتْ عائشةَ رضيَ اللَّه عَنْهَا: أَكانَ رَسُولُ اللَّهِ ﷺ يصومُ مِن كُلِّ شَهرٍ ثلاثةَ أَيَّامٍ؟ قَالَت: نَعَمْ. فَقُلْتُ: منْ أَيِّ الشَّهْر كَانَ يَصُومُ؟ قَالَتْ: لَمْ يَكُن يُبَالي مِنْ أَيِّ الشَّهْرِ يَصُومُ. I heard Muaz say; "I asked Aisyah r.a; Did the Prophet s.a.w. fast three days each month?" She replied: "Yes," I asked: "Which days did he fast?" She replied: "He did not care on which day he fasted" (Sahih Muslim) Also, we can choose an action that we want to do consistently, such as reading verses of the Quran, waking up at night even if we managed to pray just 2 rakaat of tahajjud (night vigil prayer) just before Subuh or giving charity every Friday. Hopefully, this will become a habit, not only during Ramadan but after that as well. 5. Prepare for Syawal Prepare for Hari Raya before fasting in Ramadan, Rejab, Rajab Do the major shopping or spring cleaning before we enter Ramadan so that we can give our 100 per cent of focus in Ramadan for acts of worship. It is troublesome to divide our time for Hari Raya preparation while trying to achieve the goals we have set in Ramadan. So why not do them now? 6. Plan Your Meals And Work Out Plan your meals for Ramadan, rejab, rajab Undoubtedly, for us to be able to do these acts of worship, we need a healthy body. As the saying goes, a healthy body leads to a healthy mind. Plan your meals so that you will eat moderately and waste less. Plan your workout activities. Fasting should not be the reason to skip our exercise. Do workouts that focus on strength rather than cardio. 7. Prepare For Your Menstruation Days Find out what is allowed during menstruation in islam, Rejab, Rajab Ladies, don’t despair. These days are there not for us to feel sad nor to stop all our deeds. Instead, we can increase worship. There are only a few prohibitions during this time such as fasting, praying and holding the Quran. Aside from that, we can still do zikr (words of remembrance), give charity and help to prepare sahur (breakfast) and iftar (breaking the fast). Read: 7 Things You Can Do If You Cannot Fast During Ramadan 8. Make Constant Dua Make constant Dua to reach Ramadan, Rejab, Rajab It was narrated in Lataif al-Ma’arif by Ibn Rajab Al-Hanbali that the companions will supplicate for 6 months to allow them to reach Ramadan safely. They will then pray for another 6 months after Ramadan that may Allah accept from them their acts of worship observed in the month of Ramadan. We can recite the following doa: اللَّهُمَّ بَارِكْ لَنَا فِي رَجَب، وَشَعْبَانَ، وَبَلِّغْنَا رَمَضَانَ Allahumma barik lana fi Rajab wa Sha’ban wa ballighna Ramadan “O Allah make the months of Rajab and Sha’ban blessed for us and let us reach the month of Ramadan.” (Musnad Ahmad) And the Dua: اللَّهُمَّ سَلِّمْنِي مِنْ رَمَضَانَ، وَسَلِّمْ رَمَضَانَ لِي، وَتَسَلَّمْهُ مِنِّي مُتَقَبَّلًا Allahumma Sallimni min Ramadhan. Wa sallim Ramadhana li. Wa tasallamhu minni mutaqabbala “O Allah preserve me for Ramadan, safeguard Ramadan for me and accept it for me.” (narrated by Imam At-Tabrani) After all, it is His blessings in Ramadan that we yearn for. So in preparing to reap the rewards, let’s turn to Him and ask from the Most Giving. May Allah eases our preparation to meet the holy month this year and May Allah s.w.t accept all our deeds. https://muslim.sg/articles/how-to-prepare-for-ramadan https://donshafi911.blogspot.com/2024/02/8-tips-to-prepare-for-ramadan-in-rajab.html
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  • In a world obsessed with success, happiness, and the pursuit of financial abundance, the concept of a "Money Mind Hack" promises an effortless path to unlocking prosperity. The idea is tantalizing, and the allure of tapping into a hidden reservoir of wealth has captured the imagination of many. But does such a secret really exist, or is it just another alluring mirage? In this review, we delve into the enigma of the "Money Mind Hack" to separate fact from fiction and explore its potential impact on our lives.

    The Promise:

    The proponents of the Money Mind Hack theory claim that by aligning our thoughts and beliefs with a specific set of principles, we can attract money, success, and happiness effortlessly. It suggests that the key lies in reprogramming our subconscious mind to eliminate limiting beliefs and foster a positive and abundance-oriented mindset.

    Exploring the Techniques:

    Various techniques are purported to facilitate this transformation. Visualization exercises, positive affirmations, and gratitude practices are often recommended as tools to reshape one's mental landscape. Advocates argue that by consistently applying these techniques, individuals can shift their focus from scarcity to abundance, thereby attracting financial prosperity into their lives.

    Real-Life Success Stories:

    Anecdotes abound of individuals who claim to have experienced a significant positive shift in their lives after embracing the Money Mind Hack principles. Stories of newfound success, unexpected windfalls, and improved well-being circulate within the community of believers. While these narratives are compelling, skeptics argue that personal anecdotes alone do not constitute empirical evidence.

    Scientific Basis:

    Critics of the Money Mind Hack theory often demand a scientific foundation for its claims. Proponents point to the fields of positive psychology and neuroscience to support the idea that altering thought patterns can indeed influence behavior and outcomes. However, the scientific community remains divided on the extent to which these principles can be applied to manifest financial success specifically.

    The Role of Action:

    One key aspect often emphasized in the Money Mind Hack philosophy is the role of inspired action. While the theory suggests that a positive mindset can attract opportunities, critics argue that success also requires practical effort, strategic planning, and hard work. The debate centers on whether the Money Mind Hack is a shortcut to success or a complementary approach to traditional goal-setting and achievement.

    CLICK HERE--https://sites.google.com/view/moneyhack23/home
    In a world obsessed with success, happiness, and the pursuit of financial abundance, the concept of a "Money Mind Hack" promises an effortless path to unlocking prosperity. The idea is tantalizing, and the allure of tapping into a hidden reservoir of wealth has captured the imagination of many. But does such a secret really exist, or is it just another alluring mirage? In this review, we delve into the enigma of the "Money Mind Hack" to separate fact from fiction and explore its potential impact on our lives. The Promise: The proponents of the Money Mind Hack theory claim that by aligning our thoughts and beliefs with a specific set of principles, we can attract money, success, and happiness effortlessly. It suggests that the key lies in reprogramming our subconscious mind to eliminate limiting beliefs and foster a positive and abundance-oriented mindset. Exploring the Techniques: Various techniques are purported to facilitate this transformation. Visualization exercises, positive affirmations, and gratitude practices are often recommended as tools to reshape one's mental landscape. Advocates argue that by consistently applying these techniques, individuals can shift their focus from scarcity to abundance, thereby attracting financial prosperity into their lives. Real-Life Success Stories: Anecdotes abound of individuals who claim to have experienced a significant positive shift in their lives after embracing the Money Mind Hack principles. Stories of newfound success, unexpected windfalls, and improved well-being circulate within the community of believers. While these narratives are compelling, skeptics argue that personal anecdotes alone do not constitute empirical evidence. Scientific Basis: Critics of the Money Mind Hack theory often demand a scientific foundation for its claims. Proponents point to the fields of positive psychology and neuroscience to support the idea that altering thought patterns can indeed influence behavior and outcomes. However, the scientific community remains divided on the extent to which these principles can be applied to manifest financial success specifically. The Role of Action: One key aspect often emphasized in the Money Mind Hack philosophy is the role of inspired action. While the theory suggests that a positive mindset can attract opportunities, critics argue that success also requires practical effort, strategic planning, and hard work. The debate centers on whether the Money Mind Hack is a shortcut to success or a complementary approach to traditional goal-setting and achievement. CLICK HERE--https://sites.google.com/view/moneyhack23/home
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  • What media reports fail to tell you about October 7
    Alison Weir November 13, 2023 bbc, Gaza, hamas
    What media reports fail to tell you about October 7
    BBC's Lucy Williamson is taken by the Israeli military to view kibbutz damage.regurgitating Israeli claims. (photo)
    It is journalistic malpractice for the media to still be repeating so credulously the Israeli military’s account of that day, including alleged Hamas atrocities that turned out to be fiction

    Media neglected to report much key information, e.g. Israeli military commanders had ordered the shelling of kibbutz houses in order to eliminate the “terrorists along with the hostages”… once Israeli special forces arrived: “They eliminated everyone, including the hostages”

    Are the images of charred bodies evidence that Israeli civilians and Hamas fighters burned alongside each other, after they were engulfed in flames caused by Israeli shelling of the houses?

    While this article focuses on BBC coverage, it’s analysis applies equally to US media. Some news coverage, in fact, has been considerably worse

    By Jonathan Cook, reposted from Jonathan Cook Substack, Nov 2, 2023.

    The BBC’s Lucy Williamson was taken once again this week to view the terrible destruction at a kibbutz community just outside Gaza attacked on October 7. As we have been shown so many times before, the Israeli homes were riddled with automatic fire, both inside and out. Sections of concrete wall had holes in them, or had collapsed entirely. And parts of the buildings that were still standing were deeply charred. It looked like a small snapshot of the current horrors in Gaza.

    There is a possible reason for those similarities – one that the BBC is studiously failing to report, despite mounting evidence from a variety of sources, including the Israeli media. Instead the BBC is sticking resolutely to a narrative crafted for them, and the rest of the western media, by the Israeli military: that Hamas alone caused all this destruction.

    Simply repeating that narrative without any caveats has by now reached the level of journalistic malpractice. And yet that is precisely what the BBC does night after night.

    Just a cursory look at the wreckage in the various kibbutz communities that were attacked that day should raise questions in the mind of any good reporter. Were Palestinian militants in a position to actually inflict physical damage to that degree and extent with the kind of light weapons they carried?

    And if not, who else was in a position to wreak such havoc other than Israel?

    A separate question that good journalists ought to be asking is this: What was the purpose of such damage? What did the Palestinian militants hope to achieve by it?

    The implicit answer the media is supplying is also the answer the Israeli military wants western publics to hear: that Hamas engaged in an orgy of gratuitious killing and savagery because … well, let’s say the quiet part out loud: because Palestinians are inherently savage.

    With that as the implicit narrative, western politicians have been handed a licence to cheerlead Israel as it murders a Palestinian child in Gaza every few minutes. Savages only understand the language of savagery, after all.

    Brutal tango

    For this reason alone, any journalist who wishes to avoid colluding in the genocide unfolding in Gaza ought to be increasingly wary of simply repeating the Israeli military’s claims about what happened on October 7. Certainly, they should not credulously regurgitate the latest agitprop from the IDF press office, as the BBC is so evidently doing.

    What we know from a growing body of evidence gleaned from the Israeli media and Israeli eyewitnesses – carefully laid out, for example, in this report from Max Blumenthal – is that the Israeli military was completely blindsided by that day’s events. Heavy artillery, including tanks and attack helicopters, was called in to deal with Hamas. That appears to have been a straightforward decision in regard to the military bases Hamas had overrun.

    Israel has a long-standing policy of seeking to prevent Israeli soldiers from being taken captive – chiefly, because of the high price Israeli society insists on paying to ensure soldiers are returned. For decades, the military’s so-called “Hannibal procedure” has directed Israeli troops to kill fellow soldiers rather than allow them to be taken captive. For the same reason, Hamas expends a great deal of energy in trying to find innovative ways to seize soldiers.

    The two sides are essentially engaged in a brutal tango in which each understands the other’s dance moves.

    Given Hamas’ situation, effectively managing the Israeli-controlled concentration camp of Gaza, it has limited resistance strategies available to it. Capturing Israeli soldiers maximises its leverage. They can be traded for the release of many of the thousands of Palestinian political prisoners held in jails inside Israel, in breach of international law. In addition, in the negotiations, Hamas usually hopes to win an easing of Israel’s 16-year siege of Gaza.

    To avert this scenario, Israeli commanders reportedly called in the attack helicopters on the military bases overwhelmed by Hamas on October 7. The helicopters appear to have fired indiscriminately, despite the risk posed to the Israeli soldiers in the base who were still alive. Israel’s was a scorched-earth policy to stop Hamas achieving its aims. That may, in part, explain the very large proportion of Israeli soldiers among the 1,300 killed that day.

    Charred bodies

    But what about the situation in the kibbutz communities? By the time the army arrived and was in position, Hamas was well dug in. It had taken the inhabitants as hostages inside their own homes. Israeli eyewitness testimony and media reports suggest Hamas was almost certainly trying to negotiate safe passage back into Gaza, using the Israeli civilians as human shields. The civilians were the Hamas fighters’ only ticket out, and they could be converted later into bargaining chips for the release of Palestinian prisoners.

    [YouTube and others are suppressing the video below – see this]

    The evidence – from Israeli media reports and eyewitnesses, as well as a host of visual clues from the crime scene itself – tell a far more complex story than the one presented nightly on the BBC.

    Did the Israeli military fire into the Hamas-controlled civilian homes in the same fashion as it had fired into its own military bases, and with the same disregard for the safety of Israelis inside? Was the goal in each case to prevent at all costs Hamas taking hostages whose release would require a very high price from Israel?

    Kibbutz Be’eri has been a favoured destination for BBC reporters keen to illustrate Hamas’ barbarity. It is where Lucy Williamson headed again this week. And yet none of her reporting highlighted comments made to the Israeli Haaretz newspaper by Tuval Escapa, the kibbutz’s security coordinator. He said Israeli military commanders had ordered the “shelling [of] houses on their occupants in order to eliminate the terrorists along with the hostages”.

    That echoed the testimony of Yasmin Porat, who sought shelter in Be’eri from the nearby Nova music festival. She told Israeli Radio that once Israeli special forces arrived: “They eliminated everyone, including the hostages because there was very, very heavy crossfire.”

    Are the images of charred bodies presented by Williamson, accompanied by a warning of their graphic, upsetting nature, incontrovertible proof that Hamas behaved like monsters, bent on the most twisted kind of vengeance? Or might those blackened remains be evidence that Israeli civilians and Hamas fighters burned alongside each other, after they were engulfed in flames caused by Israeli shelling of the houses?

    Israel will not agree to an independent investigation so a definitive answer will never be forthcoming. But that does not absolve the media of their professional and moral duty to be cautious.

    Consider for a moment the stark contrast in the western media’s treatment of events on October 7 and its treatment of the strike on the car park at Al-Ahli Baptist Hospital in northern Gaza on October 17, in which hundreds of Palestinians were reported killed.
    In the case of Al-Ahli, the media were only too ready to cast aside all the evidence that the hospital had been hit by an Israeli strike immediately Israel contested the claim. Instead journalists hurriedly amplified Israel’s counter-allegation that a Palestinian rocket had fallen on the hospital. Most of the media moved on after concluding “The truth may never be clear”, or even less credibly, that Palestinian militants were the most likely culprits.

    In telling contrast, the western media have not been willing to raise even a single question about what happened on October 7. They have enthusiastically attributed every horror that day to Hamas. They have ignored the reality of utter chaos that reigned for many hours and the potential for poor, desperate and morally dubious decision-making by the Israeli military.

    In fact, the media have gone much further. In advancing the narrative of “Hamas as savages”, they have promoted obvious fictions, such as the story that “Hamas beheaded 40 babies”. That piece of fake news was even taken up briefly by US President Joe Biden, before it was quietly walked back by his officials.


    Similarly, it is still a popular throwaway line among the western commentariat that “Hamas carried out rapes”, though once again the allegation is evidence-free so far.

    We should be clear. If Israel had serious evidence for either of these claims, it would be aggressively promoting it. Instead, it is doing the next best thing: letting innuendo gently sink into the audience’s subconscious, settling there as a prejudice that cannot be interrogated.

    Hamas undoubtedly committed war crimes on October 7 – not least, by taking civilians as human shields. But that kind of crime is one we are familiar with, one “ordinary” enough that the Israel military has been regularly documented carrying it out too. The practice of Israeli soldiers taking Palestinians as human shields goes under various names, such as the “neighbour procedure” and the “early warning procedure”.

    Worse atrocities may have happened too, especially given the unexpected scale of Hamas’ success in breaking out of Gaza. Large numbers of Palestinians escaped the enclave, some of them doubtless armed civilians with no connection to the operation. In such circumstances, it would be surprising if there were no examples of the headline-grabbing atrocities being committed.

    The issue is whether such atrocities were planned and systematic, as Israel claims and the western media repeats, or examples of rogue actions by individuals or groups. If the latter, Israel would be in no position to judge. Israel’s own history is littered with examples of such crimes, including the documented case of an Israeli army unit taking captive a Bedouin girl in 1949 and repeatedly gang-raping her.

    Savagery would certainly not be a uniquely Hamas trait. Following the October 7 attack, videos have been emerging of systematic abuses of any Hamas fighters captured, whether alive or dead. Images show them being beaten and tortured in public for the gratification of onlookers, when there is clearly not even the pretence of information gathering. Others show the bodies of Hamas fighters being defiled and mutilated.

    No one can claim the moral high ground here.

    What the media’s uncritical promotion of Israel’s “Hamas as savages” narrative has achieved is something sinister – and all too familiar from the West’s long colonial history. It has been used to demonise a whole people, presenting them either as barbarians or as the willing protectors and enablers of barbarism.

    The “savages” narrative is being weaponised by Israel to justify its mounting campaign of atrocities in Gaza. Which is why it is so important that journalists don’t simply allow themselves to be spoonfed. Far too much is at stake.

    Hamas committed war crimes on October 7 on a scale that is unprecedented for any Palestinian group. But there is little more than Israeli narrative spin so far to suggest that there was an unparalleled depravity to Hamas’ actions. Certainly from what we know, it is hard to see that anything Hamas did that day was worse, or more savage, than what Israel has been doing daily in Gaza for weeks.

    And Israel’s actions – from bombing Palestinian families to starving them of food and water – has the blessing of every major western politician.

    Jonathan Cook is an independent British journalist who has covered the Israel-Palestine beat for 20+ years. He is a winner of the Martha Gellhorn Special Prize for Journalism. He was formerly with the Guardian and Observer newspapers.

    RELATED:

    More Palestinians killed in past 34 days than in the past 22 years combined
    A Synopsis of the Israel/Palestine Conflict
    Gaza-Israel: Latest news and statistics (the first 25 days)
    It’s not just Gaza – Israel is also killing scores in the West Bank
    Israeli communities near Gaza are on stolen land, former owners consigned to the Gaza ghetto
    The Israeli strike on Al Ahli Hospital days BEFORE the famous blast
    WATCH: What was happening in Gaza BEFORE the Hamas attack that the media didn’t tell you?
    Gideon Levy: Israel Can’t Imprison Two Million Gazans Without Paying a Cruel Price
    Palestinians inspect damage to their homes caused by Israeli air strikes on October 13, 2023, in Gaza City
    Palestinians inspect damage to their homes caused by Israeli air strikes on October 13, 2023, in Gaza City (photo)


    https://israelpalestinenews.org/what-media-reports-fail-to-tell-you-about-october-7/
    What media reports fail to tell you about October 7 Alison Weir November 13, 2023 bbc, Gaza, hamas What media reports fail to tell you about October 7 BBC's Lucy Williamson is taken by the Israeli military to view kibbutz damage.regurgitating Israeli claims. (photo) It is journalistic malpractice for the media to still be repeating so credulously the Israeli military’s account of that day, including alleged Hamas atrocities that turned out to be fiction Media neglected to report much key information, e.g. Israeli military commanders had ordered the shelling of kibbutz houses in order to eliminate the “terrorists along with the hostages”… once Israeli special forces arrived: “They eliminated everyone, including the hostages” Are the images of charred bodies evidence that Israeli civilians and Hamas fighters burned alongside each other, after they were engulfed in flames caused by Israeli shelling of the houses? While this article focuses on BBC coverage, it’s analysis applies equally to US media. Some news coverage, in fact, has been considerably worse By Jonathan Cook, reposted from Jonathan Cook Substack, Nov 2, 2023. The BBC’s Lucy Williamson was taken once again this week to view the terrible destruction at a kibbutz community just outside Gaza attacked on October 7. As we have been shown so many times before, the Israeli homes were riddled with automatic fire, both inside and out. Sections of concrete wall had holes in them, or had collapsed entirely. And parts of the buildings that were still standing were deeply charred. It looked like a small snapshot of the current horrors in Gaza. There is a possible reason for those similarities – one that the BBC is studiously failing to report, despite mounting evidence from a variety of sources, including the Israeli media. Instead the BBC is sticking resolutely to a narrative crafted for them, and the rest of the western media, by the Israeli military: that Hamas alone caused all this destruction. Simply repeating that narrative without any caveats has by now reached the level of journalistic malpractice. And yet that is precisely what the BBC does night after night. Just a cursory look at the wreckage in the various kibbutz communities that were attacked that day should raise questions in the mind of any good reporter. Were Palestinian militants in a position to actually inflict physical damage to that degree and extent with the kind of light weapons they carried? And if not, who else was in a position to wreak such havoc other than Israel? A separate question that good journalists ought to be asking is this: What was the purpose of such damage? What did the Palestinian militants hope to achieve by it? The implicit answer the media is supplying is also the answer the Israeli military wants western publics to hear: that Hamas engaged in an orgy of gratuitious killing and savagery because … well, let’s say the quiet part out loud: because Palestinians are inherently savage. With that as the implicit narrative, western politicians have been handed a licence to cheerlead Israel as it murders a Palestinian child in Gaza every few minutes. Savages only understand the language of savagery, after all. Brutal tango For this reason alone, any journalist who wishes to avoid colluding in the genocide unfolding in Gaza ought to be increasingly wary of simply repeating the Israeli military’s claims about what happened on October 7. Certainly, they should not credulously regurgitate the latest agitprop from the IDF press office, as the BBC is so evidently doing. What we know from a growing body of evidence gleaned from the Israeli media and Israeli eyewitnesses – carefully laid out, for example, in this report from Max Blumenthal – is that the Israeli military was completely blindsided by that day’s events. Heavy artillery, including tanks and attack helicopters, was called in to deal with Hamas. That appears to have been a straightforward decision in regard to the military bases Hamas had overrun. Israel has a long-standing policy of seeking to prevent Israeli soldiers from being taken captive – chiefly, because of the high price Israeli society insists on paying to ensure soldiers are returned. For decades, the military’s so-called “Hannibal procedure” has directed Israeli troops to kill fellow soldiers rather than allow them to be taken captive. For the same reason, Hamas expends a great deal of energy in trying to find innovative ways to seize soldiers. The two sides are essentially engaged in a brutal tango in which each understands the other’s dance moves. Given Hamas’ situation, effectively managing the Israeli-controlled concentration camp of Gaza, it has limited resistance strategies available to it. Capturing Israeli soldiers maximises its leverage. They can be traded for the release of many of the thousands of Palestinian political prisoners held in jails inside Israel, in breach of international law. In addition, in the negotiations, Hamas usually hopes to win an easing of Israel’s 16-year siege of Gaza. To avert this scenario, Israeli commanders reportedly called in the attack helicopters on the military bases overwhelmed by Hamas on October 7. The helicopters appear to have fired indiscriminately, despite the risk posed to the Israeli soldiers in the base who were still alive. Israel’s was a scorched-earth policy to stop Hamas achieving its aims. That may, in part, explain the very large proportion of Israeli soldiers among the 1,300 killed that day. Charred bodies But what about the situation in the kibbutz communities? By the time the army arrived and was in position, Hamas was well dug in. It had taken the inhabitants as hostages inside their own homes. Israeli eyewitness testimony and media reports suggest Hamas was almost certainly trying to negotiate safe passage back into Gaza, using the Israeli civilians as human shields. The civilians were the Hamas fighters’ only ticket out, and they could be converted later into bargaining chips for the release of Palestinian prisoners. [YouTube and others are suppressing the video below – see this] The evidence – from Israeli media reports and eyewitnesses, as well as a host of visual clues from the crime scene itself – tell a far more complex story than the one presented nightly on the BBC. Did the Israeli military fire into the Hamas-controlled civilian homes in the same fashion as it had fired into its own military bases, and with the same disregard for the safety of Israelis inside? Was the goal in each case to prevent at all costs Hamas taking hostages whose release would require a very high price from Israel? Kibbutz Be’eri has been a favoured destination for BBC reporters keen to illustrate Hamas’ barbarity. It is where Lucy Williamson headed again this week. And yet none of her reporting highlighted comments made to the Israeli Haaretz newspaper by Tuval Escapa, the kibbutz’s security coordinator. He said Israeli military commanders had ordered the “shelling [of] houses on their occupants in order to eliminate the terrorists along with the hostages”. That echoed the testimony of Yasmin Porat, who sought shelter in Be’eri from the nearby Nova music festival. She told Israeli Radio that once Israeli special forces arrived: “They eliminated everyone, including the hostages because there was very, very heavy crossfire.” Are the images of charred bodies presented by Williamson, accompanied by a warning of their graphic, upsetting nature, incontrovertible proof that Hamas behaved like monsters, bent on the most twisted kind of vengeance? Or might those blackened remains be evidence that Israeli civilians and Hamas fighters burned alongside each other, after they were engulfed in flames caused by Israeli shelling of the houses? Israel will not agree to an independent investigation so a definitive answer will never be forthcoming. But that does not absolve the media of their professional and moral duty to be cautious. Consider for a moment the stark contrast in the western media’s treatment of events on October 7 and its treatment of the strike on the car park at Al-Ahli Baptist Hospital in northern Gaza on October 17, in which hundreds of Palestinians were reported killed. In the case of Al-Ahli, the media were only too ready to cast aside all the evidence that the hospital had been hit by an Israeli strike immediately Israel contested the claim. Instead journalists hurriedly amplified Israel’s counter-allegation that a Palestinian rocket had fallen on the hospital. Most of the media moved on after concluding “The truth may never be clear”, or even less credibly, that Palestinian militants were the most likely culprits. In telling contrast, the western media have not been willing to raise even a single question about what happened on October 7. They have enthusiastically attributed every horror that day to Hamas. They have ignored the reality of utter chaos that reigned for many hours and the potential for poor, desperate and morally dubious decision-making by the Israeli military. In fact, the media have gone much further. In advancing the narrative of “Hamas as savages”, they have promoted obvious fictions, such as the story that “Hamas beheaded 40 babies”. That piece of fake news was even taken up briefly by US President Joe Biden, before it was quietly walked back by his officials. Similarly, it is still a popular throwaway line among the western commentariat that “Hamas carried out rapes”, though once again the allegation is evidence-free so far. We should be clear. If Israel had serious evidence for either of these claims, it would be aggressively promoting it. Instead, it is doing the next best thing: letting innuendo gently sink into the audience’s subconscious, settling there as a prejudice that cannot be interrogated. Hamas undoubtedly committed war crimes on October 7 – not least, by taking civilians as human shields. But that kind of crime is one we are familiar with, one “ordinary” enough that the Israel military has been regularly documented carrying it out too. The practice of Israeli soldiers taking Palestinians as human shields goes under various names, such as the “neighbour procedure” and the “early warning procedure”. Worse atrocities may have happened too, especially given the unexpected scale of Hamas’ success in breaking out of Gaza. Large numbers of Palestinians escaped the enclave, some of them doubtless armed civilians with no connection to the operation. In such circumstances, it would be surprising if there were no examples of the headline-grabbing atrocities being committed. The issue is whether such atrocities were planned and systematic, as Israel claims and the western media repeats, or examples of rogue actions by individuals or groups. If the latter, Israel would be in no position to judge. Israel’s own history is littered with examples of such crimes, including the documented case of an Israeli army unit taking captive a Bedouin girl in 1949 and repeatedly gang-raping her. Savagery would certainly not be a uniquely Hamas trait. Following the October 7 attack, videos have been emerging of systematic abuses of any Hamas fighters captured, whether alive or dead. Images show them being beaten and tortured in public for the gratification of onlookers, when there is clearly not even the pretence of information gathering. Others show the bodies of Hamas fighters being defiled and mutilated. No one can claim the moral high ground here. What the media’s uncritical promotion of Israel’s “Hamas as savages” narrative has achieved is something sinister – and all too familiar from the West’s long colonial history. It has been used to demonise a whole people, presenting them either as barbarians or as the willing protectors and enablers of barbarism. The “savages” narrative is being weaponised by Israel to justify its mounting campaign of atrocities in Gaza. Which is why it is so important that journalists don’t simply allow themselves to be spoonfed. Far too much is at stake. Hamas committed war crimes on October 7 on a scale that is unprecedented for any Palestinian group. But there is little more than Israeli narrative spin so far to suggest that there was an unparalleled depravity to Hamas’ actions. Certainly from what we know, it is hard to see that anything Hamas did that day was worse, or more savage, than what Israel has been doing daily in Gaza for weeks. And Israel’s actions – from bombing Palestinian families to starving them of food and water – has the blessing of every major western politician. Jonathan Cook is an independent British journalist who has covered the Israel-Palestine beat for 20+ years. He is a winner of the Martha Gellhorn Special Prize for Journalism. He was formerly with the Guardian and Observer newspapers. RELATED: More Palestinians killed in past 34 days than in the past 22 years combined A Synopsis of the Israel/Palestine Conflict Gaza-Israel: Latest news and statistics (the first 25 days) It’s not just Gaza – Israel is also killing scores in the West Bank Israeli communities near Gaza are on stolen land, former owners consigned to the Gaza ghetto The Israeli strike on Al Ahli Hospital days BEFORE the famous blast WATCH: What was happening in Gaza BEFORE the Hamas attack that the media didn’t tell you? Gideon Levy: Israel Can’t Imprison Two Million Gazans Without Paying a Cruel Price Palestinians inspect damage to their homes caused by Israeli air strikes on October 13, 2023, in Gaza City Palestinians inspect damage to their homes caused by Israeli air strikes on October 13, 2023, in Gaza City (photo) https://israelpalestinenews.org/what-media-reports-fail-to-tell-you-about-october-7/
    ISRAELPALESTINENEWS.ORG
    What media reports fail to tell you about October 7
    It's journalistic malpractice for media to repeat the Israeli military's accounts, including alleged atrocities that turned out to be fiction
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  • In a world driven by financial success and abundance, many of us seek the secret formula to unlock prosperity and attract wealth into our lives. What if I told you that the key to your financial abundance lies within you, encoded in your very DNA? Welcome to the concept of activating your internal "Wealth DNA" – a transformative journey that holds the potential to reshape your relationship with money and manifest a life of abundance.

    Understanding the Wealth DNA:

    The idea of a "Wealth DNA" isn't a literal genetic code, but rather a metaphor for the unique set of beliefs, attitudes, and mindset patterns that influence your approach to wealth. These internal factors shape your financial reality, either propelling you towards prosperity or holding you back in a scarcity mindset.

    Activation Steps:

    Self-Reflection and Awareness:
    Begin by reflecting on your current beliefs about money. Are they positive and empowering, or do they lean towards scarcity and lack? Acknowledge any limiting beliefs and be aware of how they may be hindering your financial growth.

    Mindset Shift:
    Cultivate a positive and abundance-oriented mindset. Replace thoughts of scarcity with thoughts of abundance. Affirmations can be a powerful tool to reshape your thinking and reprogram your subconscious mind.

    Set Clear Financial Goals:
    Define your financial objectives with clarity. Whether it's saving for a dream vacation, buying a home, or starting a business, having clear goals provides direction and motivation. Break down larger goals into smaller, achievable steps.

    Continuous Learning:
    Expand your financial knowledge. Stay informed about investment opportunities, savings strategies, and financial planning. The more you know, the better equipped you are to make informed decisions that can lead to wealth accumulation.

    Gratitude Practice:
    Develop a habit of gratitude for your current financial situation, regardless of its state. Gratitude shifts your focus from what you lack to what you have, creating a positive energy that attracts more abundance into your life.

    Law of Attraction:
    Embrace the principles of the Law of Attraction. Visualize your financial goals, feel the emotions associated with achieving them, and believe in your ability to manifest prosperity. The universe responds to the energy you emit.

    Take Action:
    Activation isn't just about thoughts and intentions; it's about taking concrete steps towards your financial goals. Create a realistic plan and take consistent actions to move closer to your aspirations.
    CLICK HERE-- https://sites.google.com/view/wealthmanifestation23/home

    In a world driven by financial success and abundance, many of us seek the secret formula to unlock prosperity and attract wealth into our lives. What if I told you that the key to your financial abundance lies within you, encoded in your very DNA? Welcome to the concept of activating your internal "Wealth DNA" – a transformative journey that holds the potential to reshape your relationship with money and manifest a life of abundance. Understanding the Wealth DNA: The idea of a "Wealth DNA" isn't a literal genetic code, but rather a metaphor for the unique set of beliefs, attitudes, and mindset patterns that influence your approach to wealth. These internal factors shape your financial reality, either propelling you towards prosperity or holding you back in a scarcity mindset. Activation Steps: Self-Reflection and Awareness: Begin by reflecting on your current beliefs about money. Are they positive and empowering, or do they lean towards scarcity and lack? Acknowledge any limiting beliefs and be aware of how they may be hindering your financial growth. Mindset Shift: Cultivate a positive and abundance-oriented mindset. Replace thoughts of scarcity with thoughts of abundance. Affirmations can be a powerful tool to reshape your thinking and reprogram your subconscious mind. Set Clear Financial Goals: Define your financial objectives with clarity. Whether it's saving for a dream vacation, buying a home, or starting a business, having clear goals provides direction and motivation. Break down larger goals into smaller, achievable steps. Continuous Learning: Expand your financial knowledge. Stay informed about investment opportunities, savings strategies, and financial planning. The more you know, the better equipped you are to make informed decisions that can lead to wealth accumulation. Gratitude Practice: Develop a habit of gratitude for your current financial situation, regardless of its state. Gratitude shifts your focus from what you lack to what you have, creating a positive energy that attracts more abundance into your life. Law of Attraction: Embrace the principles of the Law of Attraction. Visualize your financial goals, feel the emotions associated with achieving them, and believe in your ability to manifest prosperity. The universe responds to the energy you emit. Take Action: Activation isn't just about thoughts and intentions; it's about taking concrete steps towards your financial goals. Create a realistic plan and take consistent actions to move closer to your aspirations. CLICK HERE-- https://sites.google.com/view/wealthmanifestation23/home
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  • This video by After Skool explains how influencers can become brainwashed by their audiences....we hear alot of discussion about influencers lying to, misleading, or brainwashing their audiances, but many times, the dynamic of influence can flow from audiances to influencers. This was a great video.
    I think it explains alot of influencers who I see start off with a more unique perspective, but eventually drift to conform more to the the majority demand. Whether consciously or unconsciously, influencers can often end up altering their belief systems and behavior in response to their, conscious or subconscious, desire to appease a larger audience and capture greater attention, admiration, and applause(or simply just money).
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XX2RpY_dj9Y
    Do you think this dynamic effects people on the Hive Network? Do you see a financial and social incentive to conform beliefs and ideas to that which is the most marketable, monetizable, and appealable? How do you think this effect stunts the rate at which collective consiousness of society is expanding and growing?
    This video by After Skool explains how influencers can become brainwashed by their audiences....we hear alot of discussion about influencers lying to, misleading, or brainwashing their audiances, but many times, the dynamic of influence can flow from audiances to influencers. This was a great video. I think it explains alot of influencers who I see start off with a more unique perspective, but eventually drift to conform more to the the majority demand. Whether consciously or unconsciously, influencers can often end up altering their belief systems and behavior in response to their, conscious or subconscious, desire to appease a larger audience and capture greater attention, admiration, and applause(or simply just money). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XX2RpY_dj9Y Do you think this dynamic effects people on the Hive Network? Do you see a financial and social incentive to conform beliefs and ideas to that which is the most marketable, monetizable, and appealable? How do you think this effect stunts the rate at which collective consiousness of society is expanding and growing?
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