• What the Sustainable Development Goals really mean for humanity

    -PART 2 OF 2

    1. Zero Poverty
    UBI's, Centralised Banking, IMF / World Bank, CBDC's

    2. Zero Hunger
    Fake Meat, GMO's, Eat Insects

    3. Good Health/Well-being
    Mass Injections, "Vaccine Passports" , Codex Alimentarius, Masks, State monitoring, Limit or eliminate access to natural remedies

    4. Good Education
    State controlled propaganda from birth. Ignorance of basic information to support independence from the system

    5. Gender Equality
    Transgenderism, Population Control, Breakdown of the family

    6. Clean Water and Sanitation
    State control of water supply and chemicals added (e.g. fluoride)

    7. Affordable and Clean Energy
    SMART grid, SMART metres, Peak Pricing, Electric Cars, raising gas/ energy prices, Green Taxes

    8. Decent Work and Economic Growth
    Mega-corporations, Crash Economies, Control of means of production , Destroy small businesses-PART 4

    9. Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure
    Restrictions on travel,closure of airports, 15 min cities

    10. Reduce Inequality within and between countries
    Crash economies, CBDC'S, UBI

    11. Safe + Sustainable Human Settlements + Cities
    15 mins cities, ULEZ, Big Brother surveillance, Digital ID's, 5g

    12. Responsible Consumption and Production
    Limits on consumption (including via CBDC's), Taxes

    13. Stop Climate Change
    Climate Lockdowns, carbon taxes, control via CBDC'S, control on travel

    14. Sustainable Use of Life Below Water
    Control of oceans + mineral rights, GMO'S

    15. Sustainable Use of Life On Land
    Control of land + mineral rights, GMO'S

    16. Peace, Justice, Inclusion and Strong Institutions
    Remove rights of individual, use of CBDC's, "Online Safety Bills", Hate Speech Laws, Social isolation

    17. Global Partnerships
    Remove national sovereignty, WEF, Civil Society, Corporatocracy, NGO's
    What the Sustainable Development Goals really mean for humanity -PART 2 OF 2 1. Zero Poverty UBI's, Centralised Banking, IMF / World Bank, CBDC's 2. Zero Hunger Fake Meat, GMO's, Eat Insects 3. Good Health/Well-being Mass Injections, "Vaccine Passports" , Codex Alimentarius, Masks, State monitoring, Limit or eliminate access to natural remedies 4. Good Education State controlled propaganda from birth. Ignorance of basic information to support independence from the system 5. Gender Equality Transgenderism, Population Control, Breakdown of the family 6. Clean Water and Sanitation State control of water supply and chemicals added (e.g. fluoride) 7. Affordable and Clean Energy SMART grid, SMART metres, Peak Pricing, Electric Cars, raising gas/ energy prices, Green Taxes 8. Decent Work and Economic Growth Mega-corporations, Crash Economies, Control of means of production , Destroy small businesses-PART 4 9. Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure Restrictions on travel,closure of airports, 15 min cities 10. Reduce Inequality within and between countries Crash economies, CBDC'S, UBI 11. Safe + Sustainable Human Settlements + Cities 15 mins cities, ULEZ, Big Brother surveillance, Digital ID's, 5g 12. Responsible Consumption and Production Limits on consumption (including via CBDC's), Taxes 13. Stop Climate Change Climate Lockdowns, carbon taxes, control via CBDC'S, control on travel 14. Sustainable Use of Life Below Water Control of oceans + mineral rights, GMO'S 15. Sustainable Use of Life On Land Control of land + mineral rights, GMO'S 16. Peace, Justice, Inclusion and Strong Institutions Remove rights of individual, use of CBDC's, "Online Safety Bills", Hate Speech Laws, Social isolation 17. Global Partnerships Remove national sovereignty, WEF, Civil Society, Corporatocracy, NGO's
    Like
    1
    0 Comments 0 Shares 15705 Views
  • Let’s Talk Detox on Better Way Today
    You can also find this video on: Rumble | Facebook | Bitchute

    Join us as we learn all about detoxification with our resident health coach, Linda Rae. Linda shares her knowledge on detoxing – what it is, why it matters, and how to do it right. So sit down, grab a pencil and paper, and get ready to detox!

    We live on a poisoned planet. Whether it’s fluoride in the water, chemtrail agents in the air, parabens in cosmetics, or pesticides sprayed on our vegetables – it’s a challenge to avoid toxins these days.

    Linda’s presentation identifies sources of toxic substances to be aware of, the body’s organ systems they affect, symptoms to look out for, and actions we can take to reduce exposure to toxins and get rid of them from our bodies. From nutritious, protective food choices to homemade deodorants, skin brushing, and castor oil packs, there is a lot we can do.

    Linda’s detox basics presentation can be found here as a standalone video as well – perfect for sharing with family and friends!

    Tune in for the latest Better News with Christof Plothe, DO and Emma Sron, World Council for Health announcements, and to see where WCH has been out and about in the last week! Here is some of what we discussed on today’s show:

    Australians abandon failed mRNA Covid shots

    Historic #FluorideLawsuit Happening Right Now: Everything You Need to Know

    5 Takeaways From This Week’s Testimony in Landmark Fluoride Trial

    The WHO Overplays its Hand and Watches Support Drain Away

    Photos from the Irish Expedition to expose the WHO power grab

    All eyes on Ireland and the Crotty Judgment

    More About Linda Rae

    Linda is a certified Health Coach and founder of Blissful Mum, a health coaching service that offers personalised health coaching to empower mothers to prioritise their well-being, ensuring they can create a nurturing and joyful family environment.
    Drawing on her training as a health coach and her professional experience in occupational therapy and mental health, combined with personal experience of being a mother of two young boys, Linda provides tailored support to help mothers navigate the complexities of motherhood, improve their health, and find fulfillment in their roles.
    Linda’s mission is to foster happy families by guiding mothers toward a balanced and healthy lifestyle.
    View all previous episodes of our live shows here.

    Mhttps://rumble.com/v4cyra6-lets-talk-detox-on-better-way-today.html
    Let’s Talk Detox on Better Way Today You can also find this video on: Rumble | Facebook | Bitchute Join us as we learn all about detoxification with our resident health coach, Linda Rae. Linda shares her knowledge on detoxing – what it is, why it matters, and how to do it right. So sit down, grab a pencil and paper, and get ready to detox! We live on a poisoned planet. Whether it’s fluoride in the water, chemtrail agents in the air, parabens in cosmetics, or pesticides sprayed on our vegetables – it’s a challenge to avoid toxins these days. Linda’s presentation identifies sources of toxic substances to be aware of, the body’s organ systems they affect, symptoms to look out for, and actions we can take to reduce exposure to toxins and get rid of them from our bodies. From nutritious, protective food choices to homemade deodorants, skin brushing, and castor oil packs, there is a lot we can do. Linda’s detox basics presentation can be found here as a standalone video as well – perfect for sharing with family and friends! Tune in for the latest Better News with Christof Plothe, DO and Emma Sron, World Council for Health announcements, and to see where WCH has been out and about in the last week! Here is some of what we discussed on today’s show: Australians abandon failed mRNA Covid shots Historic #FluorideLawsuit Happening Right Now: Everything You Need to Know 5 Takeaways From This Week’s Testimony in Landmark Fluoride Trial The WHO Overplays its Hand and Watches Support Drain Away Photos from the Irish Expedition to expose the WHO power grab All eyes on Ireland and the Crotty Judgment More About Linda Rae Linda is a certified Health Coach and founder of Blissful Mum, a health coaching service that offers personalised health coaching to empower mothers to prioritise their well-being, ensuring they can create a nurturing and joyful family environment. Drawing on her training as a health coach and her professional experience in occupational therapy and mental health, combined with personal experience of being a mother of two young boys, Linda provides tailored support to help mothers navigate the complexities of motherhood, improve their health, and find fulfillment in their roles. Linda’s mission is to foster happy families by guiding mothers toward a balanced and healthy lifestyle. View all previous episodes of our live shows here. Mhttps://rumble.com/v4cyra6-lets-talk-detox-on-better-way-today.html
    0 Comments 0 Shares 17629 Views
  • Sodium fluoride is toxic.
    It should not be added to drinking water.
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-13059969/Millions-fluoride-added-tap-water-biggest-expansion-controversial-scheme-1980s.html
    Sodium fluoride is toxic. It should not be added to drinking water. https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-13059969/Millions-fluoride-added-tap-water-biggest-expansion-controversial-scheme-1980s.html
    WWW.DAILYMAIL.CO.UK
    Millions to get fluoride added to tap water in expansion of scheme
    Revealed as part of the Government's long-awaited dental recovery plan the fluoride expansion will see an initial 1.6million people having the mineral added to their drinking supply.
    Like
    1
    0 Comments 1 Shares 1616 Views
  • After eight years in legal limbo, the second phase of the fluoride lawsuit will begin in January. Will we see the end of water fluoridation in the United States?
    After eight years in legal limbo, the second phase of the fluoride lawsuit will begin in January. Will we see the end of water fluoridation in the United States?
    WWW.ACTIVISTPOST.COM
    Landmark Fluoride Lawsuit Restarts in January: Here Are Four Reasons You Should Care - Activist Post
    On December 4, Judge Edward Chen called for the second phase of the long-delayed fluoride lawsuit to resume on January 31, 2024.
    Like
    1
    0 Comments 0 Shares 2159 Views
  • Maintaining proper oral hygiene is crucial for overall health and well-being. A healthy mouth not only enhances your smile but also helps prevent various dental and systemic diseases. In this comprehensive guide, we will delve into the importance of oral hygiene, discuss effective oral care practices, explore common oral health issues, and provide tips for maintaining optimal oral health. So let's dive in and discover everything you need to know about oral hygiene.


    Table of Contents


    Introduction to Oral Hygiene

    The Basics of Oral Hygiene

    Brushing Techniques and Tips

    Choosing the Right Toothbrush and Toothpaste

    The Importance of Flossing

    Benefits of Mouthwash


    Key Components of an Effective Oral Care Routine

    Regular Dental Check-ups

    Professional Dental Cleaning

    Dental Sealants and Fluoride Treatments


    Understanding Common Oral Health Issues

    Tooth Decay and Cavities

    Gum Disease: Causes, Prevention, and Treatment

    Bad Breath: Causes and Remedies

    Tooth Sensitivity: Causes and Solutions


    The Role of Diet in Oral Health

    Foods That Promote Healthy Teeth and Gums

    Foods to Avoid for Optimal Oral Health


    The Link Between Oral Hygiene and Overall Health

    Oral Health and Heart Disease

    Oral Health and Diabetes

    Oral Health and Pregnancy

    Oral Health and Respiratory Infections


    Oral Hygiene Tips for Different Stages of Life

    Oral Care for Children

    Oral Care for Teens

    Oral Care for Adults

    Oral Care for Seniors


    Oral Hygiene Products: What to Look For

    Choosing the Right Toothbrush

    Types of Toothpaste and Their Benefits

    Flossing Tools and Techniques

    Mouthwash and Its Varieties


    Natural Remedies for Oral Health

    Oil Pulling

    Herbal Mouthwashes

    Homemade Toothpaste Recipes


    The Importance of Oral Hygiene in Preventive Dentistry



    Preventive Treatments and Procedures

    Benefits of Preventive Dentistry



    Frequently Asked Questions about Oral Hygiene



    How Often Should I Brush and Floss?

    Are Electric Toothbrushes Better than Manual Ones?

    Can Poor Oral Hygiene Cause Bad Breath?

    Are Natural Toothpastes Effective?



    Conclusion


    1. Introduction to Oral Hygiene

    Maintaining good oral hygiene is essential for both the health of your teeth and gums and your overall well-being. Oral hygiene encompasses a range of practices that help prevent dental issues such as tooth decay, gum disease, and bad breath. It involves regular brushing, flossing, and rinsing with mouthwash, as well as visiting your dentist for check-ups and cleanings. By adopting proper oral hygiene habits, you can enjoy a healthy smile and reduce the risk of various oral health problems.


    2. The Basics of Oral Hygiene

    To start your journey towards excellent oral hygiene, it's crucial to understand the basics. Let's explore the key elements of an effective oral care routine.


    Brushing Techniques and Tips

    Brushing your teeth is the foundation of good oral hygiene. It helps remove plaque, bacteria, and food particles that can lead to tooth decay and gum disease. Here are some essential brushing techniques and tips to keep in mind:



    Brush at least twice a day
    : Brush your teeth for two minutes, morning and night, using a soft-bristled toothbrush.

    Use the proper technique
    : Hold your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to your gums and use gentle, circular motions to clean all tooth surfaces.

    Don't forget your tongue
    : Gently brush your tongue to remove bacteria and freshen your breath.

    Replace your toothbrush regularly
    : Replace your toothbrush every three to four months or sooner if the bristles become frayed.

    Consider an electric toothbrush
    : Electric toothbrushes can be more effective at removing plaque and reducing gum inflammation.


    Choosing the Right Toothbrush and Toothpaste

    Selecting the right toothbrush and toothpaste is essential for maintaining optimal oral hygiene. Here are some factors to consider when choosing these oral care products:



    Toothbrush
    : Opt for a toothbrush with soft bristles and a comfortable grip. Consider the size and shape of the brush head to ensure it can reach all areas of your mouth.

    Toothpaste
    : Look for toothpaste that contains fluoride, as it helps strengthen tooth enamel and prevent cavities. Consider additional features like tartar control or sensitivity relief, depending on your specific needs.


    The Importance of Flossing

    Brushing alone cannot reach the tight spaces between your teeth, which is why flossing is crucial for comprehensive oral hygiene. Flossing helps remove plaque and food particles from areas that your toothbrush cannot reach. Follow these tips for effective flossing:



    Floss daily
    : Make it a habit to floss at least once a day, preferably before brushing your teeth.

    Use the right technique
    : Wind the floss around your fingers and gently insert it between your teeth. Curve the floss into a C shape and slide it up and down against each tooth surface.

    Be gentle
    : Avoid snapping the floss into your gums, as it can cause irritation and bleeding. Instead, use a gentle back-and-forth motion.


    Benefits of Mouthwash

    Mouthwash is an excellent addition to your oral care routine as it helps kill bacteria, freshens your breath, and reduces the risk of gum disease. Consider these points when using mouthwash:



    Choose the right mouthwash
    : Look for a mouthwash that contains fluoride and has antibacterial properties.

    Follow the instructions
    : Read the label and use the mouthwash as directed. Most mouthwashes recommend swishing for 30 seconds to one minute.

    Don't replace brushing and flossing
    : While mouthwash is beneficial, it should not replace brushing and flossing. It should be used as an additional step in your oral hygiene routine.


    3. Key Components of an Effective Oral Care Routine

    In addition to brushing, flossing, and using mouthwash, there are other critical components of an effective oral care routine. Let's explore these key elements.


    Regular Dental Check-ups

    Regular dental check-ups are essential for maintaining good oral health. During these visits, your dentist will examine your teeth and gums, check for any signs of dental issues, and perform professional cleanings. It is recommended to visit your dentist every six months or as advised by your oral healthcare professional.


    Professional Dental Cleaning

    Professional dental cleanings, also known as prophylaxis, are crucial for removing plaque and tartar buildup that cannot be eliminated through regular brushing and flossing. During a cleaning, a dental hygienist will use special tools to remove plaque, tartar, and stains from your teeth. This process helps prevent cavities, gum disease, and other oral health issues.


    Dental Sealants and Fluoride Treatments

    Dental sealants and fluoride treatments are preventive measures that can further protect your teeth from decay. Dental sealants are thin, protective coatings applied to the chewing surfaces of your back teeth to prevent bacteria and food particles from getting trapped in the grooves. Fluoride treatments, on the other hand, involve the application of fluoride to strengthen tooth enamel and make it more resistant to acid attacks.


    4. Understanding Common Oral Health Issues

    Despite practicing good oral hygiene, you may still encounter certain oral health issues. Understanding these problems can help you prevent, detect, and treat them effectively. Let's explore some common oral health issues.


    Tooth Decay and Cavities

    Tooth decay, also known as dental caries, is one of the most prevalent oral health issues worldwide. It occurs when bacteria in your mouth convert sugars and carbohydrates into acids that attack the tooth enamel. If left untreated, tooth decay can lead to cavities, toothaches, and even tooth loss. Preventive measures like regular brushing, flossing, and dental check-ups can help prevent tooth decay.


    Gum Disease: Causes, Prevention, and Treatment

    Gum disease, also called periodontal disease, is an infection of the gums and tissues that support your teeth. It is primarily caused by poor oral hygiene, leading to the buildup of plaque and tartar along the gumline. If left untreated, gum disease can progress from gingivitis (mild inflammation) to periodontitis (severe infection), potentially leading to tooth loss. Preventive measures like proper brushing, flossing, and regular dental cleanings can help prevent gum disease.


    Bad Breath: Causes and Remedies

    Bad breath, also known as halitosis, can be embarrassing and a sign of underlying oral health issues. Common causes of bad breath include poor oral hygiene, gum disease, dry mouth, certain foods, and underlying medical conditions. To combat bad breath, practice good oral hygiene, drink plenty of water, avoid tobacco and alcohol, and consider using mouthwash or breath fresheners.


    Tooth Sensitivity: Causes and Solutions

    Tooth sensitivity is characterized by pain or discomfort when consuming hot, cold, sweet, or acidic foods and beverages. It is often caused by exposed tooth roots, worn enamel, gum recession, or tooth decay. To alleviate tooth sensitivity, practice good oral hygiene, use desensitizing toothpaste, avoid acidic foods, and consult your dentist for appropriate treatment options.


    5. The Role of Diet in Oral Health

    Your diet plays a significant role in maintaining optimal oral health. Certain foods can promote healthy teeth and gums, while others can contribute to dental issues. Let's explore the relationship between diet and oral health.


    Foods That Promote Healthy Teeth and Gums

    Eating a balanced diet rich in nutrients can promote healthy teeth and gums. Include the following foods in your diet to support optimal oral health:



    Calcium-rich foods
    : Milk, cheese, yogurt, and leafy green vegetables provide calcium, which helps strengthen tooth enamel.

    Crunchy fruits and vegetables
    : Apples, carrots, and celery stimulate saliva production and act as natural tooth cleansers.

    Lean proteins
    : Chicken, fish, and eggs are excellent sources of phosphorus, which helps protect tooth enamel.

    Vitamin C-rich foods
    : Citrus fruits, strawberries, and bell peppers boost collagen production, which supports healthy gums.


    Foods to Avoid for Optimal Oral Health

    Certain foods and drinks can contribute to dental issues like tooth decay and gum disease. Limit or avoid the following for optimal oral health:



    Sugary and sticky foods
    : Candies, sodas, and sugary snacks can feed bacteria in your mouth, leading to tooth decay.

    Acidic foods and drinks
    : Citrus fruits, tomatoes, and carbonated beverages can erode tooth enamel over time.

    Starchy foods
    : Chips, crackers, and bread can linger in your mouth and convert to sugars, increasing the risk of tooth decay.


    6. The Link Between Oral Hygiene and Overall Health

    Maintaining good oral hygiene not only benefits your teeth and gums but also contributes to your overall health. Poor oral health has been linked to various systemic conditions. Let's explore the connection between oral hygiene and overall health.


    Oral Health and Heart Disease

    Research suggests that there may be a link between poor oral health and heart disease. The bacteria associated with gum disease can enter the bloodstream and contribute to the development of cardiovascular problems. By practicing good oral hygiene, you can potentially reduce the risk of heart disease.


    Oral Health and Diabetes

    Diabetes and oral health have a bidirectional relationship. Poorly controlled diabetes can increase the risk of gum disease, while periodontal disease can make it more challenging to control blood sugar levels. Managing diabetes and prioritizing oral hygiene can help prevent complications and improve overall health.


    Oral Health and Pregnancy

    Pregnancy hormones can affect oral health, making pregnant women more susceptible to gum disease and tooth decay. Poor oral health during pregnancy has also been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Maintaining good oral hygiene and seeking regular dental care are essential for pregnant women.


    Oral Health and Respiratory Infections

    Research suggests a connection between poor oral health and respiratory infections, such as pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Oral bacteria can be aspirated into the lungs, leading to respiratory infections. By practicing proper oral hygiene, you can potentially reduce the risk of respiratory infections.


    7. Oral Hygiene Tips for Different Stages of Life

    Oral hygiene needs evolve throughout different stages of life. Let's explore some oral care tips for each stage:


    Oral Care for Children

    Teaching children proper oral hygiene habits from an early age sets the foundation for a lifetime of good oral health. Some tips for children's oral care include:



    Start early
    : Begin cleaning your baby's gums with a soft cloth or infant toothbrush even before the first tooth erupts.

    Introduce toothbrushing
    : Once the first tooth appears, use a soft-bristled toothbrush and a smear of fluoride toothpaste to clean their teeth.

    Supervise brushing
    : Children should be supervised while brushing until they have the dexterity to do it effectively on their own.

    Encourage healthy snacks
    : Limit sugary snacks and drinks, and encourage fruits, vegetables, and dairy products for healthy teeth and gums.


    Oral Care for Teens

    Teenagers face unique oral health challenges, including orthodontic treatment and an increased risk of cavities. Here are some tips for teens' oral care:



    Orthodontic care
    : If your teen has braces or other orthodontic appliances, they must maintain proper oral hygiene and follow their orthodontist's instructions.

    Avoid tobacco and alcohol
    : Educate your teen about the risks of tobacco and alcohol on oral health, including bad breath, stained teeth, and increased gum disease risk.

    Mouthguards for sports
    : Encourage your teen to wear a mouthguard during sports activities to protect their teeth from injury.

    Regular dental check-ups
    : Schedule regular dental check-ups for your teen to monitor their oral health and address any concerns.


    Oral Care for Adults

    Maintaining good oral hygiene habits becomes even more critical in adulthood. Here are some tips for adults' oral care:



    Brush and floss daily
    : Brush your teeth at least twice a day and floss once a day to remove plaque and prevent dental issues.

    Watch for signs of gum disease
    : Look out for symptoms like bleeding gums, persistent bad breath, or gum recession, and seek dental care promptly.

    Avoid tobacco and limit alcohol
    : Tobacco use and excessive alcohol consumption can significantly impact oral health. Quit smoking and limit alcohol intake for a healthier mouth.

    Monitor oral changes
    : Pay attention to any changes in your mouth, such as sores, lumps, or discoloration, and consult your dentist if you notice anything unusual.


    Oral Care for Seniors

    As we age, our oral health needs change. Here are some oral care tips for seniors:



    Maintain diligent oral hygiene
    : Continue to brush and floss regularly and use mouthwash as needed.

    Address dry mouth
    : Dry mouth is a common issue among seniors and can increase the risk of cavities. Stay hydrated, chew sugar-free gum, and talk to your dentist about potential solutions.

    Regular dental check-ups
    : Schedule regular dental check-ups to monitor your oral health, especially if you wear dentures or have other dental appliances.

    Medication review
    : Certain medications can impact oral health. Discuss any changes in your medication with your dentist to mitigate potential side effects.


    8. Oral Hygiene Products: What to Look For

    Choosing the right oral hygiene products can enhance your oral care routine. Consider the following factors when selecting toothbrushes, toothpaste, floss, and mouthwash:


    Choosing the Right Toothbrush


    Opt for a toothbrush with soft bristles to avoid damaging your tooth enamel and gums.

    Consider the size and shape of the brush head to ensure it can reach all areas of your mouth.

    Electric toothbrushes can be a good option for those with limited dexterity or specific oral health needs.


    Types of Toothpaste and Their Benefits


    Look for toothpaste that contains fluoride, as it helps strengthen tooth enamel and prevent cavities.

    Consider additional features like tartar control, sensitivity relief, or whitening properties, depending on your specific needs.


    Flossing Tools and Techniques


    Traditional dental floss is effective for most people. However, if you struggle with traditional flossing, consider alternative options like floss picks or water flossers.

    The key is to find a method that allows you to clean between your teeth effectively.


    Mouthwash and Its Varieties


    Mouthwash can provide additional protection against bacteria, freshen your breath, and promote healthy gums.

    Look for mouthwash that contains fluoride and has antibacterial properties for maximum benefits.


    9. Natural Remedies for Oral Health

    If you prefer natural alternatives, several remedies can complement your oral hygiene routine. Here are a few natural remedies for oral health:


    Oil Pulling


    Oil pulling involves swishing oil (such as coconut or sesame oil) in your mouth for 10-20 minutes, then spitting it out.

    Proponents of oil pulling claim that it helps remove bacteria, reduces plaque, and improves oral health.


    Herbal Mouthwashes


    Several herbal mouthwashes contain natural ingredients like tea tree oil, eucalyptus oil, or peppermint oil, which can help freshen your breath and reduce bacteria.


    Homemade Toothpaste Recipes


    If you prefer making your own toothpaste, there are various homemade recipes available that use ingredients like baking soda, coconut oil, and essential oils.


    10. The Importance of Oral Hygiene in Preventive Dentistry

    Oral hygiene plays a crucial role in preventive dentistry, which focuses on maintaining oral health and preventing dental issues. Let's explore the significance of oral hygiene in preventive dentistry:


    Preventive Treatments and Procedures


    Regular dental check-ups and cleanings are essential preventive treatments that allow your dentist to detect any oral health issues early on.

    Other preventive treatments may include dental sealants, fluoride treatments, and oral cancer screenings.


    Benefits of Preventive Dentistry


    By practicing good oral hygiene and undergoing preventive treatments, you can reduce the risk of dental problems and potentially avoid costly and invasive dental procedures.

    Preventive dentistry promotes long-term oral health, enhances your quality of life, and saves you from the discomfort of dental issues.


    11. Frequently Asked Questions about Oral Hygiene

    Let's address some common questions related to oral hygiene:


    How Often Should I Brush and Floss?

    It is recommended to brush your teeth at least twice a day, ideally after meals. Flossing should be done at least once a day, preferably before brushing.


    Are Electric Toothbrushes Better than Manual Ones?

    Electric toothbrushes can be more effective at removing plaque and reducing gum inflammation. However, proper brushing technique is more important than the type of toothbrush used.


    Can Poor Oral Hygiene Cause Bad Breath?

    Yes, poor oral hygiene can lead to bad breath. Bacteria in the mouth can produce foul-smelling compounds, resulting in unpleasant breath odor.


    Are Natural Toothpastes Effective?

    Natural toothpastes can be effective at cleaning teeth and freshening breath. Look for natural toothpaste options that contain fluoride to ensure adequate protection against tooth decay.


    12. Conclusion

    Maintaining optimal oral hygiene is essential for a healthy smile and overall well-being. By following a comprehensive oral care routine, including regular brushing, flossing, and dental check-ups, you can prevent dental issues and promote a lifetime of good oral health. Remember to choose the right oral hygiene products, watch your diet, and be aware of the connection between oral health and overall health. By prioritizing oral hygiene, you can enjoy a confident smile and a healthier life.


    Now that you have a comprehensive understanding of oral hygiene, it's time to put your knowledge into practice. Start implementing these tips and recommendations to achieve optimal oral health for yourself and your loved ones.

    To Know more Click Here-- https://sites.google.com/view/newprodentim2023-24/home
    Maintaining proper oral hygiene is crucial for overall health and well-being. A healthy mouth not only enhances your smile but also helps prevent various dental and systemic diseases. In this comprehensive guide, we will delve into the importance of oral hygiene, discuss effective oral care practices, explore common oral health issues, and provide tips for maintaining optimal oral health. So let's dive in and discover everything you need to know about oral hygiene. Table of Contents Introduction to Oral Hygiene The Basics of Oral Hygiene Brushing Techniques and Tips Choosing the Right Toothbrush and Toothpaste The Importance of Flossing Benefits of Mouthwash Key Components of an Effective Oral Care Routine Regular Dental Check-ups Professional Dental Cleaning Dental Sealants and Fluoride Treatments Understanding Common Oral Health Issues Tooth Decay and Cavities Gum Disease: Causes, Prevention, and Treatment Bad Breath: Causes and Remedies Tooth Sensitivity: Causes and Solutions The Role of Diet in Oral Health Foods That Promote Healthy Teeth and Gums Foods to Avoid for Optimal Oral Health The Link Between Oral Hygiene and Overall Health Oral Health and Heart Disease Oral Health and Diabetes Oral Health and Pregnancy Oral Health and Respiratory Infections Oral Hygiene Tips for Different Stages of Life Oral Care for Children Oral Care for Teens Oral Care for Adults Oral Care for Seniors Oral Hygiene Products: What to Look For Choosing the Right Toothbrush Types of Toothpaste and Their Benefits Flossing Tools and Techniques Mouthwash and Its Varieties Natural Remedies for Oral Health Oil Pulling Herbal Mouthwashes Homemade Toothpaste Recipes The Importance of Oral Hygiene in Preventive Dentistry Preventive Treatments and Procedures Benefits of Preventive Dentistry Frequently Asked Questions about Oral Hygiene How Often Should I Brush and Floss? Are Electric Toothbrushes Better than Manual Ones? Can Poor Oral Hygiene Cause Bad Breath? Are Natural Toothpastes Effective? Conclusion 1. Introduction to Oral Hygiene Maintaining good oral hygiene is essential for both the health of your teeth and gums and your overall well-being. Oral hygiene encompasses a range of practices that help prevent dental issues such as tooth decay, gum disease, and bad breath. It involves regular brushing, flossing, and rinsing with mouthwash, as well as visiting your dentist for check-ups and cleanings. By adopting proper oral hygiene habits, you can enjoy a healthy smile and reduce the risk of various oral health problems. 2. The Basics of Oral Hygiene To start your journey towards excellent oral hygiene, it's crucial to understand the basics. Let's explore the key elements of an effective oral care routine. Brushing Techniques and Tips Brushing your teeth is the foundation of good oral hygiene. It helps remove plaque, bacteria, and food particles that can lead to tooth decay and gum disease. Here are some essential brushing techniques and tips to keep in mind: Brush at least twice a day : Brush your teeth for two minutes, morning and night, using a soft-bristled toothbrush. Use the proper technique : Hold your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to your gums and use gentle, circular motions to clean all tooth surfaces. Don't forget your tongue : Gently brush your tongue to remove bacteria and freshen your breath. Replace your toothbrush regularly : Replace your toothbrush every three to four months or sooner if the bristles become frayed. Consider an electric toothbrush : Electric toothbrushes can be more effective at removing plaque and reducing gum inflammation. Choosing the Right Toothbrush and Toothpaste Selecting the right toothbrush and toothpaste is essential for maintaining optimal oral hygiene. Here are some factors to consider when choosing these oral care products: Toothbrush : Opt for a toothbrush with soft bristles and a comfortable grip. Consider the size and shape of the brush head to ensure it can reach all areas of your mouth. Toothpaste : Look for toothpaste that contains fluoride, as it helps strengthen tooth enamel and prevent cavities. Consider additional features like tartar control or sensitivity relief, depending on your specific needs. The Importance of Flossing Brushing alone cannot reach the tight spaces between your teeth, which is why flossing is crucial for comprehensive oral hygiene. Flossing helps remove plaque and food particles from areas that your toothbrush cannot reach. Follow these tips for effective flossing: Floss daily : Make it a habit to floss at least once a day, preferably before brushing your teeth. Use the right technique : Wind the floss around your fingers and gently insert it between your teeth. Curve the floss into a C shape and slide it up and down against each tooth surface. Be gentle : Avoid snapping the floss into your gums, as it can cause irritation and bleeding. Instead, use a gentle back-and-forth motion. Benefits of Mouthwash Mouthwash is an excellent addition to your oral care routine as it helps kill bacteria, freshens your breath, and reduces the risk of gum disease. Consider these points when using mouthwash: Choose the right mouthwash : Look for a mouthwash that contains fluoride and has antibacterial properties. Follow the instructions : Read the label and use the mouthwash as directed. Most mouthwashes recommend swishing for 30 seconds to one minute. Don't replace brushing and flossing : While mouthwash is beneficial, it should not replace brushing and flossing. It should be used as an additional step in your oral hygiene routine. 3. Key Components of an Effective Oral Care Routine In addition to brushing, flossing, and using mouthwash, there are other critical components of an effective oral care routine. Let's explore these key elements. Regular Dental Check-ups Regular dental check-ups are essential for maintaining good oral health. During these visits, your dentist will examine your teeth and gums, check for any signs of dental issues, and perform professional cleanings. It is recommended to visit your dentist every six months or as advised by your oral healthcare professional. Professional Dental Cleaning Professional dental cleanings, also known as prophylaxis, are crucial for removing plaque and tartar buildup that cannot be eliminated through regular brushing and flossing. During a cleaning, a dental hygienist will use special tools to remove plaque, tartar, and stains from your teeth. This process helps prevent cavities, gum disease, and other oral health issues. Dental Sealants and Fluoride Treatments Dental sealants and fluoride treatments are preventive measures that can further protect your teeth from decay. Dental sealants are thin, protective coatings applied to the chewing surfaces of your back teeth to prevent bacteria and food particles from getting trapped in the grooves. Fluoride treatments, on the other hand, involve the application of fluoride to strengthen tooth enamel and make it more resistant to acid attacks. 4. Understanding Common Oral Health Issues Despite practicing good oral hygiene, you may still encounter certain oral health issues. Understanding these problems can help you prevent, detect, and treat them effectively. Let's explore some common oral health issues. Tooth Decay and Cavities Tooth decay, also known as dental caries, is one of the most prevalent oral health issues worldwide. It occurs when bacteria in your mouth convert sugars and carbohydrates into acids that attack the tooth enamel. If left untreated, tooth decay can lead to cavities, toothaches, and even tooth loss. Preventive measures like regular brushing, flossing, and dental check-ups can help prevent tooth decay. Gum Disease: Causes, Prevention, and Treatment Gum disease, also called periodontal disease, is an infection of the gums and tissues that support your teeth. It is primarily caused by poor oral hygiene, leading to the buildup of plaque and tartar along the gumline. If left untreated, gum disease can progress from gingivitis (mild inflammation) to periodontitis (severe infection), potentially leading to tooth loss. Preventive measures like proper brushing, flossing, and regular dental cleanings can help prevent gum disease. Bad Breath: Causes and Remedies Bad breath, also known as halitosis, can be embarrassing and a sign of underlying oral health issues. Common causes of bad breath include poor oral hygiene, gum disease, dry mouth, certain foods, and underlying medical conditions. To combat bad breath, practice good oral hygiene, drink plenty of water, avoid tobacco and alcohol, and consider using mouthwash or breath fresheners. Tooth Sensitivity: Causes and Solutions Tooth sensitivity is characterized by pain or discomfort when consuming hot, cold, sweet, or acidic foods and beverages. It is often caused by exposed tooth roots, worn enamel, gum recession, or tooth decay. To alleviate tooth sensitivity, practice good oral hygiene, use desensitizing toothpaste, avoid acidic foods, and consult your dentist for appropriate treatment options. 5. The Role of Diet in Oral Health Your diet plays a significant role in maintaining optimal oral health. Certain foods can promote healthy teeth and gums, while others can contribute to dental issues. Let's explore the relationship between diet and oral health. Foods That Promote Healthy Teeth and Gums Eating a balanced diet rich in nutrients can promote healthy teeth and gums. Include the following foods in your diet to support optimal oral health: Calcium-rich foods : Milk, cheese, yogurt, and leafy green vegetables provide calcium, which helps strengthen tooth enamel. Crunchy fruits and vegetables : Apples, carrots, and celery stimulate saliva production and act as natural tooth cleansers. Lean proteins : Chicken, fish, and eggs are excellent sources of phosphorus, which helps protect tooth enamel. Vitamin C-rich foods : Citrus fruits, strawberries, and bell peppers boost collagen production, which supports healthy gums. Foods to Avoid for Optimal Oral Health Certain foods and drinks can contribute to dental issues like tooth decay and gum disease. Limit or avoid the following for optimal oral health: Sugary and sticky foods : Candies, sodas, and sugary snacks can feed bacteria in your mouth, leading to tooth decay. Acidic foods and drinks : Citrus fruits, tomatoes, and carbonated beverages can erode tooth enamel over time. Starchy foods : Chips, crackers, and bread can linger in your mouth and convert to sugars, increasing the risk of tooth decay. 6. The Link Between Oral Hygiene and Overall Health Maintaining good oral hygiene not only benefits your teeth and gums but also contributes to your overall health. Poor oral health has been linked to various systemic conditions. Let's explore the connection between oral hygiene and overall health. Oral Health and Heart Disease Research suggests that there may be a link between poor oral health and heart disease. The bacteria associated with gum disease can enter the bloodstream and contribute to the development of cardiovascular problems. By practicing good oral hygiene, you can potentially reduce the risk of heart disease. Oral Health and Diabetes Diabetes and oral health have a bidirectional relationship. Poorly controlled diabetes can increase the risk of gum disease, while periodontal disease can make it more challenging to control blood sugar levels. Managing diabetes and prioritizing oral hygiene can help prevent complications and improve overall health. Oral Health and Pregnancy Pregnancy hormones can affect oral health, making pregnant women more susceptible to gum disease and tooth decay. Poor oral health during pregnancy has also been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Maintaining good oral hygiene and seeking regular dental care are essential for pregnant women. Oral Health and Respiratory Infections Research suggests a connection between poor oral health and respiratory infections, such as pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Oral bacteria can be aspirated into the lungs, leading to respiratory infections. By practicing proper oral hygiene, you can potentially reduce the risk of respiratory infections. 7. Oral Hygiene Tips for Different Stages of Life Oral hygiene needs evolve throughout different stages of life. Let's explore some oral care tips for each stage: Oral Care for Children Teaching children proper oral hygiene habits from an early age sets the foundation for a lifetime of good oral health. Some tips for children's oral care include: Start early : Begin cleaning your baby's gums with a soft cloth or infant toothbrush even before the first tooth erupts. Introduce toothbrushing : Once the first tooth appears, use a soft-bristled toothbrush and a smear of fluoride toothpaste to clean their teeth. Supervise brushing : Children should be supervised while brushing until they have the dexterity to do it effectively on their own. Encourage healthy snacks : Limit sugary snacks and drinks, and encourage fruits, vegetables, and dairy products for healthy teeth and gums. Oral Care for Teens Teenagers face unique oral health challenges, including orthodontic treatment and an increased risk of cavities. Here are some tips for teens' oral care: Orthodontic care : If your teen has braces or other orthodontic appliances, they must maintain proper oral hygiene and follow their orthodontist's instructions. Avoid tobacco and alcohol : Educate your teen about the risks of tobacco and alcohol on oral health, including bad breath, stained teeth, and increased gum disease risk. Mouthguards for sports : Encourage your teen to wear a mouthguard during sports activities to protect their teeth from injury. Regular dental check-ups : Schedule regular dental check-ups for your teen to monitor their oral health and address any concerns. Oral Care for Adults Maintaining good oral hygiene habits becomes even more critical in adulthood. Here are some tips for adults' oral care: Brush and floss daily : Brush your teeth at least twice a day and floss once a day to remove plaque and prevent dental issues. Watch for signs of gum disease : Look out for symptoms like bleeding gums, persistent bad breath, or gum recession, and seek dental care promptly. Avoid tobacco and limit alcohol : Tobacco use and excessive alcohol consumption can significantly impact oral health. Quit smoking and limit alcohol intake for a healthier mouth. Monitor oral changes : Pay attention to any changes in your mouth, such as sores, lumps, or discoloration, and consult your dentist if you notice anything unusual. Oral Care for Seniors As we age, our oral health needs change. Here are some oral care tips for seniors: Maintain diligent oral hygiene : Continue to brush and floss regularly and use mouthwash as needed. Address dry mouth : Dry mouth is a common issue among seniors and can increase the risk of cavities. Stay hydrated, chew sugar-free gum, and talk to your dentist about potential solutions. Regular dental check-ups : Schedule regular dental check-ups to monitor your oral health, especially if you wear dentures or have other dental appliances. Medication review : Certain medications can impact oral health. Discuss any changes in your medication with your dentist to mitigate potential side effects. 8. Oral Hygiene Products: What to Look For Choosing the right oral hygiene products can enhance your oral care routine. Consider the following factors when selecting toothbrushes, toothpaste, floss, and mouthwash: Choosing the Right Toothbrush Opt for a toothbrush with soft bristles to avoid damaging your tooth enamel and gums. Consider the size and shape of the brush head to ensure it can reach all areas of your mouth. Electric toothbrushes can be a good option for those with limited dexterity or specific oral health needs. Types of Toothpaste and Their Benefits Look for toothpaste that contains fluoride, as it helps strengthen tooth enamel and prevent cavities. Consider additional features like tartar control, sensitivity relief, or whitening properties, depending on your specific needs. Flossing Tools and Techniques Traditional dental floss is effective for most people. However, if you struggle with traditional flossing, consider alternative options like floss picks or water flossers. The key is to find a method that allows you to clean between your teeth effectively. Mouthwash and Its Varieties Mouthwash can provide additional protection against bacteria, freshen your breath, and promote healthy gums. Look for mouthwash that contains fluoride and has antibacterial properties for maximum benefits. 9. Natural Remedies for Oral Health If you prefer natural alternatives, several remedies can complement your oral hygiene routine. Here are a few natural remedies for oral health: Oil Pulling Oil pulling involves swishing oil (such as coconut or sesame oil) in your mouth for 10-20 minutes, then spitting it out. Proponents of oil pulling claim that it helps remove bacteria, reduces plaque, and improves oral health. Herbal Mouthwashes Several herbal mouthwashes contain natural ingredients like tea tree oil, eucalyptus oil, or peppermint oil, which can help freshen your breath and reduce bacteria. Homemade Toothpaste Recipes If you prefer making your own toothpaste, there are various homemade recipes available that use ingredients like baking soda, coconut oil, and essential oils. 10. The Importance of Oral Hygiene in Preventive Dentistry Oral hygiene plays a crucial role in preventive dentistry, which focuses on maintaining oral health and preventing dental issues. Let's explore the significance of oral hygiene in preventive dentistry: Preventive Treatments and Procedures Regular dental check-ups and cleanings are essential preventive treatments that allow your dentist to detect any oral health issues early on. Other preventive treatments may include dental sealants, fluoride treatments, and oral cancer screenings. Benefits of Preventive Dentistry By practicing good oral hygiene and undergoing preventive treatments, you can reduce the risk of dental problems and potentially avoid costly and invasive dental procedures. Preventive dentistry promotes long-term oral health, enhances your quality of life, and saves you from the discomfort of dental issues. 11. Frequently Asked Questions about Oral Hygiene Let's address some common questions related to oral hygiene: How Often Should I Brush and Floss? It is recommended to brush your teeth at least twice a day, ideally after meals. Flossing should be done at least once a day, preferably before brushing. Are Electric Toothbrushes Better than Manual Ones? Electric toothbrushes can be more effective at removing plaque and reducing gum inflammation. However, proper brushing technique is more important than the type of toothbrush used. Can Poor Oral Hygiene Cause Bad Breath? Yes, poor oral hygiene can lead to bad breath. Bacteria in the mouth can produce foul-smelling compounds, resulting in unpleasant breath odor. Are Natural Toothpastes Effective? Natural toothpastes can be effective at cleaning teeth and freshening breath. Look for natural toothpaste options that contain fluoride to ensure adequate protection against tooth decay. 12. Conclusion Maintaining optimal oral hygiene is essential for a healthy smile and overall well-being. By following a comprehensive oral care routine, including regular brushing, flossing, and dental check-ups, you can prevent dental issues and promote a lifetime of good oral health. Remember to choose the right oral hygiene products, watch your diet, and be aware of the connection between oral health and overall health. By prioritizing oral hygiene, you can enjoy a confident smile and a healthier life. Now that you have a comprehensive understanding of oral hygiene, it's time to put your knowledge into practice. Start implementing these tips and recommendations to achieve optimal oral health for yourself and your loved ones. To Know more Click Here-- https://sites.google.com/view/newprodentim2023-24/home
    0 Comments 0 Shares 20065 Views
  • The truth about fluoride’s toxicity is one step closer to being released to the public, but will industry influence prevent its release?
    The truth about fluoride’s toxicity is one step closer to being released to the public, but will industry influence prevent its release?
    WWW.ACTIVISTPOST.COM
    NTP Advisory Board Unanimously Votes to Accept Report on Fluoride’s Toxicity - Activist Post
    The legal battle between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Fluoride Action Network (FAN) began in 2016.
    Like
    3
    0 Comments 0 Shares 1291 Views
  • On Tuesday Judge Edward Chen, the Fluoride Action Network, and the U.S. EPA set a date of January 29, 2024 for the second phase of the ongoing #fluoride lawsuit.
    On Tuesday Judge Edward Chen, the Fluoride Action Network, and the U.S. EPA set a date of January 29, 2024 for the second phase of the ongoing #fluoride lawsuit.
    WWW.ACTIVISTPOST.COM
    Second Phase of Fluoride Lawsuit Set to Begin in January 2024 - Activist Post
    FAN is attempting to prove that fluoride is a neurotoxin and should be regulated or banned under the TSCA.
    Like
    3
    0 Comments 0 Shares 1332 Views
  • Suppressed Documents Show Scientists with U.S. Government Find Fluoride Lowers IQ in Children

    It's a completely unprecedented set of events that has never been seen before on any NTP monograph in all the years that they've been doing monographs and this one has been now reviewed, you know, internally - and then by five external reviewers and by the National Academy of Sciences multiple times and the US government was trying to say, well, let's review it one other time...

    Ultimately the government relented and just this Wednesday, they posted these 1,500 pages of documents on the government website, The national toxicology program website and as suspected these documents do not make a good case for fluoride. r.

    Full Video: https://theconsciousresistance.com/suppressed-fluoride-docs/
    Suppressed Documents Show Scientists with U.S. Government Find Fluoride Lowers IQ in Children It's a completely unprecedented set of events that has never been seen before on any NTP monograph in all the years that they've been doing monographs and this one has been now reviewed, you know, internally - and then by five external reviewers and by the National Academy of Sciences multiple times and the US government was trying to say, well, let's review it one other time... Ultimately the government relented and just this Wednesday, they posted these 1,500 pages of documents on the government website, The national toxicology program website and as suspected these documents do not make a good case for fluoride. r. Full Video: https://theconsciousresistance.com/suppressed-fluoride-docs/
    Like
    3
    0 Comments 0 Shares 2354 Views 1
  • Suppressed Documents Show Scientists with U.S. Government Find Fluoride Lowers IQ in Children

    It's a completely unprecedented set of events that has never been seen before on any NTP monograph in all the years that they've been doing monographs and this one has been now reviewed, you know, internally - and then by five external reviewers and by the National Academy of Sciences multiple times and the US government was trying to say, well, let's review it one other time...

    Ultimately the government relented and just this Wednesday, they posted these 1,500 pages of documents on the government website, The national toxicology program website and as suspected these documents do not make a good case for fluoride. r.

    Full Video: https://theconsciousresistance.com/suppressed-fluoride-docs/
    Suppressed Documents Show Scientists with U.S. Government Find Fluoride Lowers IQ in Children It's a completely unprecedented set of events that has never been seen before on any NTP monograph in all the years that they've been doing monographs and this one has been now reviewed, you know, internally - and then by five external reviewers and by the National Academy of Sciences multiple times and the US government was trying to say, well, let's review it one other time... Ultimately the government relented and just this Wednesday, they posted these 1,500 pages of documents on the government website, The national toxicology program website and as suspected these documents do not make a good case for fluoride. r. Full Video: https://theconsciousresistance.com/suppressed-fluoride-docs/
    Like
    1
    0 Comments 0 Shares 2206 Views 1
  • Suppressed Documents Show Scientists with U.S. Government Find Fluoride Lowers IQ in Children

    Derrick Broze breaks down his two latest articles detailing the release of documents from the U.S. National Toxicology Program which concluded that high fluoride exposure can reduce the IQ of children. Derrick explains what these documents mean and share other important findings!

    WATCH: https://theconsciousresistance.com/suppressed-fluoride-docs/
    Suppressed Documents Show Scientists with U.S. Government Find Fluoride Lowers IQ in Children Derrick Broze breaks down his two latest articles detailing the release of documents from the U.S. National Toxicology Program which concluded that high fluoride exposure can reduce the IQ of children. Derrick explains what these documents mean and share other important findings! WATCH: https://theconsciousresistance.com/suppressed-fluoride-docs/
    THECONSCIOUSRESISTANCE.COM
    Suppressed Documents Show Scientists with U.S. Government Find Fluoride Lowers IQ in Children - The Conscious Resistance Network
    Derrick Broze breaks down his two latest articles detailing the release of documents from the U.S. National Toxicology Program which concluded that high fluoride exposure can reduce the IQ of children.
    Like
    3
    0 Comments 0 Shares 1475 Views
  • Derrick Broze breaks down his two latest articles detailing the release of documents from the U.S. National Toxicology Program which concluded that high fluoride exposure can reduce the IQ of children.
    Derrick Broze breaks down his two latest articles detailing the release of documents from the U.S. National Toxicology Program which concluded that high fluoride exposure can reduce the IQ of children.
    Like
    1
    0 Comments 0 Shares 1598 Views
  • Newly released documents reveal how scientists at the U.S. National Toxicology Program fought to preserve their conclusion that #fluoride can reduce IQ in children.
    Newly released documents reveal how scientists at the U.S. National Toxicology Program fought to preserve their conclusion that #fluoride can reduce IQ in children.
    WWW.ACTIVISTPOST.COM
    Newly Released Review of Fluoride’s Toxicity Highlights NTP Scientist’s Battle to Follow the Science - Activist Post
    The NTP review was made public on Wednesday per an agreement between the U.S. EPA and the Fluoride Action Network.
    Like
    1
    0 Comments 0 Shares 1459 Views
  • The U.S. government has been forced to release a controversial draft review that confirms previous studies which found exposure to fluoride at high levels can reduce IQ in children.
    The U.S. government has been forced to release a controversial draft review that confirms previous studies which found exposure to fluoride at high levels can reduce IQ in children.
    WWW.NATURALBLAZE.COM
    US Government Releases Censored Documents Detailing Fluoride’s Impact on Childhood IQ
    The U.S. National Toxicology Program has released a long-delayed review of the science behind claims that fluoride reduces IQ in children.
    Like
    Love
    2
    0 Comments 0 Shares 1595 Views
  • Derrick Broze Update on NTP Fluoride Report Release: Friends,

    The US NTP has posted the previously blocked version of the NTP monograph on fluoride's toxicity. These documents will surely shape the decisions of Judge Chen during the next hearing in April for the #FluorideLawsuit.

    Stay tuned for an article update.

    https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/about_ntp/bsc/2023/fluoride/documents_provided_bsc_wg_031523.pdf

    #Fluoride #FluorideTrial #News #BreakingNews #Chemicals
    Derrick Broze Update on NTP Fluoride Report Release: Friends, The US NTP has posted the previously blocked version of the NTP monograph on fluoride's toxicity. These documents will surely shape the decisions of Judge Chen during the next hearing in April for the #FluorideLawsuit. Stay tuned for an article update. https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/about_ntp/bsc/2023/fluoride/documents_provided_bsc_wg_031523.pdf #Fluoride #FluorideTrial #News #BreakingNews #Chemicals
    Like
    5
    0 Comments 0 Shares 5074 Views